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Old 07-16-2009, 11:23 AM #1
beejill beejill is offline
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beejill beejill is offline
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My Mood: My mom's story that may help.
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Default My mom's story that may help.

Many of you are coming to this site because either you or a loved one has been diagnosed with an anuerysm. This anuerysm may be ruptured or unruptured and you are searching incessently every combination you can on the internet to get as much information as possible about aneurysms, treatment options, risks, and countless other information. I know because I too just like you sat there night and day searching whatever I could find about anuerysms when my mother was diagnosed early March of this year.

You may be feeling emotions such as fear, anger, or saddness and let me assure you they are all common to feel at this time of uncertainity. I am writing my mom's story so that you may find comfort in knowing that it may not be as bad as the countless studies you have been reading from several years ago.

My mother's story begins in late Febuary when she woke up 3 consecutive days with the worst headache she had ever had before in her life. My sister then took her to the ER where they did a cat scan (which they said was normal) and subsequently ruled the headaches to be caused by sphenoid sinusitis. Just to be on the safe side my sister had a friend who works for a nuerologist to pull the cat scan results and have her doctor give them a look. That curiosity turned into fear as he informed us that he saw something on the cat scan and that we should go to Emory University for a second opinon. Upon arrival at Emory they did a lumbar puncture and ran some more tests from which they determined that mom had 2 unruptured anuerysms and that the headaches she had were not related to them.

Mom was discharged from the hospital and had many of the same feelings your loved one might have of fear of these ticking time bombs in her head and what to do. The first thing mom decided to do to help her situation was to quit smoking which she did cold turkey although it was not without it's tough times and withdrawls. A few weeks later we met with the neuro surgeon for the first time. The nuero surgeon told mom that she did indeed have 2 unruptured anuerysms and that coiling would not be an option for either of them.

He said an angiogram would need to be performed to get the specifics of the anuerysm but that they would need to be surgically clipped. A few weeks passed and finally the angio was peformed (which brought it's own nervousness since there is a very very minute risk of stroke during the procedure). The angio confirmed the results that the Dr. had suspected that both would need to be clipped in seperate surgeries to be performed 3 months apart. Going into the angio mom was uncertain about having the surgery do to the low risk of rupture (roughly 1% per year depending on the location). During the Angio however she found comfort from the nurse who spoke highly of the neurosurgeon. Mom came out of the angio determined to have the surgery which came as a shock to my sister and me.

The surgery was set for July 1st 2009. A week before the scheduled surgery we were called and informed that it would be moved to the 10th instead because of a scheduling conflict. This at first really upset mom and anyone could understand the emotions she was feeling as now she had to wait even longer to take care of this first and most dangerous anuerysm. (bi-lobbed 14 MM) The change turned out to be great as the whole family spent the 4th of July at the lake which was the first time mom had ever been to the lake.

Finally the day arrived not without much nervousness and fear but mom remained strong and positive through the whole situation. (An attitude which she believes made the difference in the surgery) We arrived at the hospital at 5:30 in the morning while we waited with nervous anticipation for mom to be called back. At roughly 8:15 they called mom back to start getting her ready for surgery. I accompanied her back and shortly after I was joined by my sister. We stayed with her while they put the first IV in and got her ready to take to the room for surgery. When the room was prepped and ready we were asked to leave and then our anxious waiting began.

We sat for what seemed like an eternity waiting and waiting to hear what was going on with our mother. Evidently they are supposed to update you on the status of the procedure from the operating room but we did not get that call until about Noon after we asked the status of the surgery. We were informed that mom's surgery began at 10:03 and that as of noon things were going well. We eagerly watched the screen avaliable in the waiting room that stated whether your loved one is 1.) pre-op 2.) in surgery 3.) in recovery 4. ) transferred to ICU. Another hour and a half passed with no word or change in her status and at approximately 1:36 P.M the doctor entered the waiting area.

We eagerly stood as he informed us that he surgery while very complicated (even more so than originally thought) went smoothly. He also informed us that it was a good thing we decided on the surgery because the blood had began to swirl in the anuerysm and the walls were becoming very thin. We were told that mom would go to recovery where the breathing tube would be removed when she started to wake up from the anethesia and that we would be able to see her in a couple of hours.

So again we found ourselves eagerly waiting. Finally at about 4:45 P.M. Mom was transferred to the Neuro-ICU and we were able to see her. She was still very groggy but was asking for us and even told me and my sister she loved us before we exited the room to allow her to rest. The next few hours we waited in the waiting room and my thoughts began to wander to all the stuff I had read on the internet about recovery and the daunting task that we faced now. Before surgery I did not know what mom would be like after surgery what deficits she may have or what problems she may face. I guess we all worry about being one of those 10% that the studies say will come out with mental deficit.

Those 2 hours passed and mom woke and we all went into her room. She talked just fine and seemed to suprisingly remember so many things about the specifics of the day and her surgery. After talking with her for a little while we again exited to the waiting room where my sister and I would sleep for the night. At about 2:33 A.M. my sister woke me to say that mom's bandage had been removed from her head. Mom was again awake and despite the usual severe headache which was being treated with a combination of morphine and perkeset seemed to be doing ok. We again exited to allow her to sleep and returned around 7:00 A.M. When we returned they had removed the drain from her head and the cathedar from her bladder. She did her usual tests to check for brain swelling, cognition, and arm/leg performance.

The first morning mom did not eat anything but by lunch time she was hungry and ate some of her lunch. That afternoon she was transferred to a regular room on the Neuro floor. The next night was pretty eventful as the catheder had been removed and now we had to use a bed side potty every few hours which was a process in itself. It required her leg stockings (to prevent blood clots) to be removed and assistance out of the bed due to her being so weak from the surgery. The pain was again a problem and medication was administered as expected to control it.

Morning came and mom ate much better as her appetite began to return on day 2 post surgery. She was also able to get up and walk all the way to the bathroom as opposed to using the bed side potty. The pain by the day became more managable and the duration between pain medication being administered became longer.

By day 3 post surgery mom was walking the hallway and taking laps around the ward in an attempt to assist in her recovery. The doctors were amazed with how well she was doing and honestly with everything I had read about other people's stories I was pretty amazed too. She was eating good and things appeared to be going pretty well.

It was at this point the nuerosurgeon entered the room accompanied by 6 other people. All 7 of them entering the room was a pretty overwhelming and honestly somewhat scary experience. (It is my believe that all of these people had some hand in mom's surgery) The surgeon asked mom how she was doing and when she wanted to go home. Mom said "I thought I was doing good till all yall came in but you tell me" She went on to say she thought she might be ready to go home the next day.

Day 4 post surgery and Day 5 overall mom was preparing to come home. At approximately 2:35 she arrived. Tired and somewhat nausuas from the ride home she spent most of the rest of the day doing some walking and enjoying being at home. Before her departure from the hospital she was given a page of discharge instructions she was to follow to the T.

It is now the 2nd full day at home and mom is doing pretty well. She is walking and even spending sometime on the computer. Despite the pain which still exists to some extent (still being managed by meds although nowhere near as bad as it was post-op), she is recovering nicely which is a testament to our Lord and the many prayers that were lifted up for my mother.


My goal in writing this was to give each of you that read it a more detailed story of what to expect when facing an unruptured anuerysm. My mother and I are both availiable should you have any questions or concerns that you would like to ask us via email. One thing that we have learned is that each person's situation is different but if we can be of any help we surely would like to be. We which each of you all the best in life.



Mom:

Myself:
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Old 10-12-2009, 11:06 AM #2
berykute berykute is offline
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Thanks to you and your MOM!
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Old 10-15-2009, 09:31 PM #3
beejill beejill is offline
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beejill beejill is offline
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Originally Posted by berykute View Post
Thanks to you and your MOM!
you are so very welcome
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Old 03-22-2011, 04:51 AM #4
nellybelly nellybelly is offline
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Originally Posted by beejill View Post
Many of you are coming to this site because either you or a loved one has been diagnosed with an anuerysm. This anuerysm may be ruptured or unruptured and you are searching incessently every combination you can on the internet to get as much information as possible about aneurysms, treatment options, risks, and countless other information. I know because I too just like you sat there night and day searching whatever I could find about anuerysms when my mother was diagnosed early March of this year.

You may be feeling emotions such as fear, anger, or saddness and let me assure you they are all common to feel at this time of uncertainity. I am writing my mom's story so that you may find comfort in knowing that it may not be as bad as the countless studies you have been reading from several years ago.

My mother's story begins in late Febuary when she woke up 3 consecutive days with the worst headache she had ever had before in her life. My sister then took her to the ER where they did a cat scan (which they said was normal) and subsequently ruled the headaches to be caused by sphenoid sinusitis. Just to be on the safe side my sister had a friend who works for a nuerologist to pull the cat scan results and have her doctor give them a look. That curiosity turned into fear as he informed us that he saw something on the cat scan and that we should go to Emory University for a second opinon. Upon arrival at Emory they did a lumbar puncture and ran some more tests from which they determined that mom had 2 unruptured anuerysms and that the headaches she had were not related to them.

Mom was discharged from the hospital and had many of the same feelings your loved one might have of fear of these ticking time bombs in her head and what to do. The first thing mom decided to do to help her situation was to quit smoking which she did cold turkey although it was not without it's tough times and withdrawls. A few weeks later we met with the neuro surgeon for the first time. The nuero surgeon told mom that she did indeed have 2 unruptured anuerysms and that coiling would not be an option for either of them.

He said an angiogram would need to be performed to get the specifics of the anuerysm but that they would need to be surgically clipped. A few weeks passed and finally the angio was peformed (which brought it's own nervousness since there is a very very minute risk of stroke during the procedure). The angio confirmed the results that the Dr. had suspected that both would need to be clipped in seperate surgeries to be performed 3 months apart. Going into the angio mom was uncertain about having the surgery do to the low risk of rupture (roughly 1% per year depending on the location). During the Angio however she found comfort from the nurse who spoke highly of the neurosurgeon. Mom came out of the angio determined to have the surgery which came as a shock to my sister and me.

The surgery was set for July 1st 2009. A week before the scheduled surgery we were called and informed that it would be moved to the 10th instead because of a scheduling conflict. This at first really upset mom and anyone could understand the emotions she was feeling as now she had to wait even longer to take care of this first and most dangerous anuerysm. (bi-lobbed 14 MM) The change turned out to be great as the whole family spent the 4th of July at the lake which was the first time mom had ever been to the lake.

Finally the day arrived not without much nervousness and fear but mom remained strong and positive through the whole situation. (An attitude which she believes made the difference in the surgery) We arrived at the hospital at 5:30 in the morning while we waited with nervous anticipation for mom to be called back. At roughly 8:15 they called mom back to start getting her ready for surgery. I accompanied her back and shortly after I was joined by my sister. We stayed with her while they put the first IV in and got her ready to take to the room for surgery. When the room was prepped and ready we were asked to leave and then our anxious waiting began.

We sat for what seemed like an eternity waiting and waiting to hear what was going on with our mother. Evidently they are supposed to update you on the status of the procedure from the operating room but we did not get that call until about Noon after we asked the status of the surgery. We were informed that mom's surgery began at 10:03 and that as of noon things were going well. We eagerly watched the screen avaliable in the waiting room that stated whether your loved one is 1.) pre-op 2.) in surgery 3.) in recovery 4. ) transferred to ICU. Another hour and a half passed with no word or change in her status and at approximately 1:36 P.M the doctor entered the waiting area.

We eagerly stood as he informed us that he surgery while very complicated (even more so than originally thought) went smoothly. He also informed us that it was a good thing we decided on the surgery because the blood had began to swirl in the anuerysm and the walls were becoming very thin. We were told that mom would go to recovery where the breathing tube would be removed when she started to wake up from the anethesia and that we would be able to see her in a couple of hours.

So again we found ourselves eagerly waiting. Finally at about 4:45 P.M. Mom was transferred to the Neuro-ICU and we were able to see her. She was still very groggy but was asking for us and even told me and my sister she loved us before we exited the room to allow her to rest. The next few hours we waited in the waiting room and my thoughts began to wander to all the stuff I had read on the internet about recovery and the daunting task that we faced now. Before surgery I did not know what mom would be like after surgery what deficits she may have or what problems she may face. I guess we all worry about being one of those 10% that the studies say will come out with mental deficit.

Those 2 hours passed and mom woke and we all went into her room. She talked just fine and seemed to suprisingly remember so many things about the specifics of the day and her surgery. After talking with her for a little while we again exited to the waiting room where my sister and I would sleep for the night. At about 2:33 A.M. my sister woke me to say that mom's bandage had been removed from her head. Mom was again awake and despite the usual severe headache which was being treated with a combination of morphine and perkeset seemed to be doing ok. We again exited to allow her to sleep and returned around 7:00 A.M. When we returned they had removed the drain from her head and the cathedar from her bladder. She did her usual tests to check for brain swelling, cognition, and arm/leg performance.

The first morning mom did not eat anything but by lunch time she was hungry and ate some of her lunch. That afternoon she was transferred to a regular room on the Neuro floor. The next night was pretty eventful as the catheder had been removed and now we had to use a bed side potty every few hours which was a process in itself. It required her leg stockings (to prevent blood clots) to be removed and assistance out of the bed due to her being so weak from the surgery. The pain was again a problem and medication was administered as expected to control it.

Morning came and mom ate much better as her appetite began to return on day 2 post surgery. She was also able to get up and walk all the way to the bathroom as opposed to using the bed side potty. The pain by the day became more managable and the duration between pain medication being administered became longer.

By day 3 post surgery mom was walking the hallway and taking laps around the ward in an attempt to assist in her recovery. The doctors were amazed with how well she was doing and honestly with everything I had read about other people's stories I was pretty amazed too. She was eating good and things appeared to be going pretty well.

It was at this point the nuerosurgeon entered the room accompanied by 6 other people. All 7 of them entering the room was a pretty overwhelming and honestly somewhat scary experience. (It is my believe that all of these people had some hand in mom's surgery) The surgeon asked mom how she was doing and when she wanted to go home. Mom said "I thought I was doing good till all yall came in but you tell me" She went on to say she thought she might be ready to go home the next day.

Day 4 post surgery and Day 5 overall mom was preparing to come home. At approximately 2:35 she arrived. Tired and somewhat nausuas from the ride home she spent most of the rest of the day doing some walking and enjoying being at home. Before her departure from the hospital she was given a page of discharge instructions she was to follow to the T.

It is now the 2nd full day at home and mom is doing pretty well. She is walking and even spending sometime on the computer. Despite the pain which still exists to some extent (still being managed by meds although nowhere near as bad as it was post-op), she is recovering nicely which is a testament to our Lord and the many prayers that were lifted up for my mother.


My goal in writing this was to give each of you that read it a more detailed story of what to expect when facing an unruptured anuerysm. My mother and I are both availiable should you have any questions or concerns that you would like to ask us via email. One thing that we have learned is that each person's situation is different but if we can be of any help we surely would like to be. We which each of you all the best in life.



Mom:

Myself:
Hi, I wanted to say thankyou for posting this, you well pretty much summed me up.
I hav an 8mm ICA aneurysm that I am having clipped (soon hopefully) I am seeing my Neurosurgeon again this Friday, and to be honest I have felt every emotion possible.
I was originally lead to believe that I was the first person on either side of my family to have an aneurysm, and only 4 days ago after getting in contact with one of my relatives that is doing our family tree and and Aunt, I have since found out that another Aunt and 2 of my Uncles also had aneurysms, 2 of them being fatal.
I can only hope and pray that my surgery and recovery goes as well as your mum's seems to of gone.
I am so pleased for you and your family to have found the unwanted visitors, and for your mum to have received such great care,
Good luck with the future and after reading your story, you have given me hope
Narelle
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Old 08-19-2021, 04:09 PM #5
Katgeo Katgeo is offline
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Default Thank you for your mom's story

So nice to hear a positive story! I am post unruptured brain aneurysm. My surgery was done on May 28, 2021, it was an incidental finding. Was at my daughter's house and we were talking and I began having trouble finding the right words. We left for the hospital of course we thought it was a possible stroke. I was immediately taken back to ER where a MRI was done. I was admitted and taken to the Cardiac floor. After a short while, I was informed that there was no signs of a stroke, which made me feel like I was alright. Then I had a visit from the Nerosurgeon and his assistant, in the MRI the Nerosurgeon reviewed he found an Aneurysm, they spoke to me about the surgery and explained the procedure, they wanted to do the surgery the next day. The Aneurysm was 5.2 mm I asked if I could get back to them, they gave me to 4:00 pm. I contacted the surgeon's assistant and after taking all in told her I wanted the surgery. I knew nothing about Aneurysm I was okay with my decision. I also found out that the reason for my speaking problem, it was Hyponatremia my Sodium level had dropped to 119, which should be 135. I was surprised that I was scheduled for surgery early am and noone had preped me. The coiling procedure through the groin was what the Nerosurgeon recommended. Taking to the operating center of the hospital, I first met with the Anesthesia Dr. who began an IV, next the Nerosurgeon staff showed up and I was taken into this odd looking operating room. There was a long operating table with side area for your arms. The Anesthesia Dr. placed the Anesthesia mask over my mouth and nose. I could see a screen above me, I assume that's what the surgeon uses to guide the threads and coil up to the Aneurysm. There was plenty of staff to the left and right of me. I woke up on the table, I was extremely cold. Then I realized I was completely wet. I asked why and was told I had urinated. Now I was embarrassed and cold. I was told surgery went well. All lifted me onto the bed to take me to the ICU. Normally post op patients for Aneurysms are placed on their back and not to move for 6 hours, for me it was 12 hours. My leg up to above my knee was in a devise that kept me from moving, also the gadget that's inserted into the groin wasn't removed as yet.
I spent the night and most of the next day in the ICU. It was approximately 6:00pm the 2nd day that the device on my leg was removed and it was painful they removed the device that was in my groin. I was tired, I was discharged from the ICU and taken to the Nerology floor. I was there for several days, I had an alarm set on my bed if I needed to go to the bathroom I had to contact the Nurses station. Fall risk, I had a Physical therapist come in to work with me, I was up walking, but became a little dizzy on turning. I felt it was from being in bed so long. Also had a Speech therapist that worked with me. By day 6 I was really hoping to go home, another Dr came in late day and being that my Sodium level was back to normal, he said he didn't see any reason not to discharge me. Then all Doctors, Speech Therapist and Physical Therapist had to sign off for me to receive my complete discharge papers. I hadn't had a bath or shower in 6 days, on the way home we stopped and filled the prescriptions. I was so weak and tired I waited in the car. Arriving home I had to have help into the house. I went straight to bed. When I would get up I had to hold onto walls and dressers. I was tired for about a week it hurt to speak from the breathing tube down my throat. Each day I was getting my strength back. I had noticed actually in the hospital when I was watching the TV these silver like streaks. I thought it was in the film. At home I noticed it more so, I have an appointment with eye surgeons to see what's creating the optical streaks. I have many good days, I changed my diet completely. I started getting out every day just to walk around. I had my three week follow up with Nerosurgeon and in now another 3 months they will go through the groin again, but it's not going to be like before. I will only need general Anesthesia and nothing down my throat. This is too be sure that all has healed properly. Keeping positive!
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Old 08-20-2021, 11:37 PM #6
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I just wanted to welcome you to the NeuroTalk Support Groups, Katgeo, and thanks for your amazing post describing your experiences during what must have been a very frightening time. I hope that all goes well for you in the future.
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