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Old 08-30-2006, 03:54 PM   #1
Bobbi
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Arrow Useful Sites

Bipolar Disorder Information and Resources from Bipolar.com
http://www.bipolar.com/

Bipolar Disorder, Manic Depression
http://www.bipolarworld.net/

Bipolar Disorder Online Support
http://www.findthelight.net/bipolar/bipolar.htm

Bipolar Significant Others
http://www.bpso.org/

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance
http://www.dbsalliance.org/

Harbor of Refuge: Bipolar Disorder / Manic-Depression Support
Peer to peer support for people with Bipolar Disorder and the people who care about them.
http://www.harbor-of-refuge.org/

Information about Bipolar Disorder
http://www.dbsalliance.org/info/bipolar.html

NIMH: Bipolar Disorder
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/bipolar.cfm

National Mental Health Association Fact Sheet: Bipolar Disorder
http://www.nmha.org/infoctr/factsheets/76.cfm

The Winds of Change Bipolar Disorder Online Support GroupSupport group maintains email discussion group, chat room, message boards, writings.
http://www.thewindsofchange.org/old/index.html
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Old 10-05-2006, 10:33 PM   #2
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www.moodswing.org
www.psycheducation.org
www.mcmanweb.com
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Old 10-10-2006, 12:28 PM   #3
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Arrow The ashton manual for withdrawl from benzos

http://www.benzo.org.uk/bzmono.htm
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Old 10-14-2006, 10:08 AM   #4
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Arrow 10 common distorted ideas

Recognizing Your Distortions
(from health news on line)
http://www.everydayhealth.com/public...33873ee877&p=3


Ten common cognitive distortions appear below. They are based on theories of cognitive therapy expounded by Aaron T. Beck, M.D., which were further refined and brought to popular attention by David D. Burns, M.D. Do any of these distortions resonate with you? Use this list to help make you aware of ingrained negative thought patterns and try to substitute more realistic, positive thoughts.

All or nothing. If you don’t perform flawlessly, you consider yourself a complete failure.

Overgeneralization. One negative event, such as a slight from your spouse or an encounter with a dishonest merchant, fits into an endless pattern of dismaying circumstances and defeat. For example, you might think, "He’s always cold" or "You can’t trust anyone."

Mental filter. One negative episode, such as a rude comment made to you during an otherwise enjoyable evening, shades everything like a drop of food coloring in a glass of water.

Ignoring the positive. Positive input, such as an affectionate gesture or outright praise, just doesn’t count. Self-deprecation deflects all compliments. You might say, "It’s no big deal."

Leaping to conclusions. You draw negative conclusions without checking to see if they have any foundation in fact. You may be mind reading: "My friend seems upset, she must be mad at me." Or you may be fortune telling: "I just know the results of my medical test won’t be good."

Magnification or minimization. You exaggerate potential problems or mistakes until they snowball into a catastrophe (as in the lab results example in Recognizing Your Distortions). Or you minimize anything that might make you feel good, such as appreciation for a kind act you did or the recognition that other people have flaws, too.

Emotional reasoning. You feel sure that your negative, emotional view of a situation reflects hard and fast truth. For example: "My husband drops his socks on the floor just to aggravate me."

"Should" statements. You adhere to a rigid set of beliefs and internal rules about what you "should" be doing and feel guilty when you don’t stay the course.

Labeling. Rather than describe a mistake or challenge in your life, you label yourself negatively: "I’m a screw-up." When another person’s behavior bothers you, you pin a global label on him or her: "She’s so controlling."

Personalization. You blame yourself for triggering a negative event that occurred for complex reasons or for something that was largely out of your control. "If I had taken care of myself properly, I never would have gotten cancer."

Other clues can also help you identify distorted thinking. Sentences that include the words "must," "should," "ought," "always," and "never" are often harsher than necessary and reflect rigid thinking that could stand to be softened.
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Old 10-14-2006, 10:10 AM   #5
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warning signs of suicide

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Red Flags: Warning Signs of Suicide
From Kimberly Read & Marcia Purse,
Your Guide to Bipolar Disorder.
FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!
Bipolar Basics
by Kimberly Read

Of all the words in our very colorful language which inspire an immediate sense of horror (and there are many!), suicide has to be among the top. Just the mention of the word brings that gut-wrenching feeling of dread, of disbelief, of misunderstanding, of fear ... of horror. It is a word charged with difficult emotion and, therefore, a topic of discussion which people avoid at all costs. It is taboo.

However, the figures are frightening. According to the Centers for Disease Control, in the year 2002 suicide was the 8th ranked cause of death in the United States overall, but worse still, was the third leading cause of death for those aged 10-24, and the second leading cause for ages 25-34.


According to the Samaritans, a group which provides confidential emotional support for people in crisis, it is estimated that more than 100,000 people attempt suicide each year in the United Kingdom. Of these attempts, 7,000 will succeed in taking their lives.
Worse yet, it is estimated that as many as 20% of people who suffer from Bipolar Disorder will kill themselves. That's one out of every five! And as many as 50% - half! - of all manic depressive people may attempt suicide at least once in their lives. This is an appalling statistic, and one that shows the tremendous need for proper diagnosis and treatment of this devastating mental illness.

So the subject of suicide is not something we can ignore. It will not go away. Each of us needs to make the commitment to learning the warnings signs, the red flags, of despair, so we may be prepared - prepared to help a friend in crisis, prepared to see the cry for help from a loved one, prepared to seek help when our own resources for coping have worn thin.

I have attempted to organize these red flags into broad categories for easier reference. I have gathered this list of symptoms from personal experience as well as the following resource for additional information:

How to Prevent Suicide


Situational Indicators
Loss of a Relationship Via Rejection or Separation
Death of a Loved One
Diagnosis of a Terminal Illness
Loss of Financial Security
A Change in Physical Appearance
Loss of Employment/A New Job
Loss of Self Esteem
Abuse
Emotional Indicators
Depression
Hopelessness
Helplessness
A Sudden Lift Of Depression!
It is a well-known fact that as a person begins to climb from depression the possibility of a suicide attempt increases. There are two thoughts as to why this happens. The first is that when a person makes up her mind to take her own life, she becomes at peace with the situation. She feels more in control and thus the depression begins to lighten. The second idea is that as lethargy lifts, a person finds the energy to carry out suicidal plans he made while incapacitated. Regardless of the reason, however, this is a very critical time.

Behavioral Indicators
Acquiring a Weapon
Hoarding Medication
Putting Affairs in Order
Making or Changing a Will
Increased Interest in Suicide
Giving Away Personal Belongings
Mending Grievances
Checking on Insurance Policy
Withdrawing from People
Verbal Indicators
Straightforward Comments:
"I wish I were dead"
"I wish I had the nerve to kill myself."
"I wish I could die in my sleep."
"If it weren't for my kids, my husband ... I would commit suicide."


Hints:
"I hate life."
"Why do I bother?"
"I can't take it anymore."
"Nothing matters anymore."
In conclusion, I would like to note that these signs are not proof positive someone is considering suicide. Any number of these may be evident, but the person has given little or no thought to taking their own life. The reverse is also true. A person may give no warning of an impending suicide attempt. So how do you know for sure? Ask. Yes, ask! Be open to discussing this difficult subject with your loved one. It could save a life.

Updated: September 29, 2006
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Old 10-14-2006, 10:15 AM   #6
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symptoms of bipolar disorder in children

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Red Flags: Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder in Children
From Kimberly Read & Marcia Purse,
Your Guide to Bipolar Disorder.
FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!
Bipolar Child Basics
by Kimberly Read


Randy is an endearing five year-old boy with an engaging smile. And yet, he has a history of tempestuous behavior that has followed him since infancy. He is bright, articulate, a fast learner - and as unpredictable as a tornado. From the time he cut his first tooth, he began biting - often drawing blood. At one and a half years old, Randy was dismissed from pre-school for aggressive behavior. He consistently scores high marks for academics, but has a string of "needs improvement" comments in all areas of behavior. He is loving, cuddling, wanting to be held one minute; screaming and raging with veins bulging from his neck the next.

Randy's parents are exasperated. They have attended many a parenting class, read a plethora of books, and tried every means of discipline suggested by family, friends, teachers and doctors.

Some say, "Randy is just all boy.


He will grow out of it." Others suggest, "Randy has Attention Deficit Disorder. Ask your doctor for Ritalin." A few point their fingers at the parents: "You need to take a firm hand with Randy. A good spanking is what that boy needs."
Many whisper, "Can you believe that boy Randy? I would never allow a child of mine to behave like that."

No one seems willing to consider the idea that Randy may have early-onset Bipolar Disorder. His mother has struggled with depression most of her life. His father has Bipolar Disorder. Randy is a prime candidate for a mood disorder.

A study conducted by Demitri Papolos, MD, and Janice Papolos indicates that over 80% of children who have Bipolar Disorder come from families with a history of mood disorders and/or alcoholism on both sides of the family. And yet, even when a strong family history of this is present, professionals rarely consider early-onset Bipolar Disorder. Many children who actually have Bipolar Disorder have been diagnosed with ADHD. Why? Because the official guidelines for diagnosing Bipolar Disorder found in the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) outline criteria based on classic adult symptoms. When the last edition of the DSM was published, very little was known about how Bipolar Disorder presents itself in children.

A great deal more is now known about Bipolar Disorder in children. Demitri and Janice Papolos have written a well-researched book entitled The Bipolar Child: The Definitive and Reassuring Guide to Childhood's Most Misunderstood Disorder. I was thrilled to review such a wonderful book. We applaud Demitri and Janice for providing this much needed, insightful resource! Below is an excerpt from their work (reprinted with permission), which lists those symptoms common to children who have early-onset Bipolar Disorder.

Very Common

Separation Anxiety

Rages & Explosive Temper Tantrums (lasting up to several hours)

Marked Irritability

Oppositional Behavior

Frequent Mood Swings

Distractibility

Hyperactivity

Impulsivity

Restlessness/ Fidgetiness

Silliness, Goofiness, Giddiness

Racing Thoughts

Aggressive Behavior

Grandiosity

Carbohydrate Cravings

Risk-Taking Behaviors

Depressed Mood

Lethargy

Low Self-Esteem

Difficulty Getting Up in the Morning

Social Anxiety

Oversensitivity to Emotional or Environmental Triggers
Common
Bed-Wetting (especially in boys)

Night Terrors

Rapid or Pressured Speech

Obsessional Behavior

Excessive Daydreaming

Compulsive Behavior

Motor & Vocal Tics

Learning Disabilities

Poor Short-Term Memory

Lack of Organization

Fascination with Gore or Morbid Topics

Hypersexuality

Manipulative Behavior

Bossiness

Lying

Suicidal Thoughts

Destruction of Property

Paranoia

Hallucinations & Delusions
Less Common
Migraine Headaches

Bingeing

Self-Mutilating Behaviors

Cruelty to Animals
Updated: June 18, 2006
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Old 10-16-2006, 05:30 AM   #7
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Default The schizophrenia and bipolar disorder genetics blog

http://www.genetics.med.ed.ac.uk/blog/?cat=4
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Old 10-16-2006, 05:32 AM   #8
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Default National resource center on psychiatric advance directives

http://www.nrc-pad.org/
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Old 10-16-2006, 07:41 PM   #9
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Arrow The trouble with spikol blog on mental illness

http://trouble.philadelphiaweekly.com/
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Old 10-16-2006, 08:07 PM   #10
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Arrow depression and bipolar support alliance

** Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance
I'd like to share a wonderful info. website and/or DBSA's phone number(s). This is a wonderful organization, that offers info. and support. The pdocs on their advisory board are well known, reputable doctors and researchers, who have contributed so much to the field of Psychiatry.
There are some mentioned at this website that already have written books,journals, and periodicals, many available to the general public.

DBSA's phone numbers:
(800) 826 - 3632 or (312) 642 - 0049

website: www.DBSAlliance.org
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