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Old 11-18-2021, 12:38 AM #1
funnylegs4 funnylegs4 is offline
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Question Yelling during seizure

I was on a Zoom call with a friend of mine and her students who have intellectual disability and during the Zoom call one of the students yelled like "UHHHH!" and since this student is only semi verbal and uses sign language I thought she was simply expressing anger or displeasure at what the student next to her was doing until the para said "She's having a seizure" and a few seconds later the student was fine like nothing happened, perfectly conscious and acting as though nothing changed. "That was a seizure?!!! Was she expressing pain?!" I said in shock and the para simply said, "We have no way of knowing if she feels pain or not when she has seizures because she can't tell us".
Are seizures where someone yells out common?
Is yelling during a seizure a sign of pain? Or is it from the seizure effecting speech areas in the brain?
​​​​​​​If it happens again is there a way to help?
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Old 11-18-2021, 11:45 AM #2
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Hi, funnylegs,

Crying out is listed as one of the ways people behave during a seizure:

Types of Seizures | Epilepsy | CDC

I've always understood that there's nothing much that anyone needs to do to help someone having a seizure except to let it pass. If it goes on for more than 5 minutes, that's an emergency to call 911 about. Otherwise you just make sure the person isn't in any danger.

Nobody knows much about just what is being experienced by a person having a seizure because there's never any memory of the seizure, but some people have seizures often and live perfectly normal lives otherwise.
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Old 11-18-2021, 07:30 PM #3
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I would say that yelling out in a seizure would be a form of a complex seizure.
But not positive, this just means that its something that the person wont
remember anything about. Its one of the kind of seizures my son has.

And there are simple seizures that they remember what happens most of the
time. My son has both of these, and the gran mals, and drops and other kinds.

But there is no way to know if they are in pain. Other than if they fall and
hit there head or something like that.
Donna
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