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Helpful Information About Lyme Disease

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Old 03-16-2007, 11:01 AM   #1
wasabi
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Arrow Helpful Information About Lyme Disease

I have chronic Lyme disease, so I just wanted to start a thread where I could post helpful information about Lyme disease. Any replies would be welcome too.
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Old 03-16-2007, 11:12 AM   #2
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Default General Information on Lyme Disease

This is an article which provides some good general information on Lyme disease - Diagnostic Hints and Treatment Guidelines for Lyme and Other Tick Bourne Illnesses. Here are some excerpts:

From Introduction:
To me, "Lyme Disease" is not simply an infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, but a complex illness potentially consisting of multiple tick-derived co-infections. In later stages, it also includes collateral conditions that result from being ill with multiple pathogens, each of which can have profound impact on the person's overall health. Together, damage to virtually all bodily systems can result. In addition, it is possible to see latent infections reactivate, especially viruses of the Herpes type.

From Background Information - General Measures:
Magnesium deficiency is very often present and quite severe. Hyperreflexia, muscle twitches, myocardial irritability, and recurrent tight muscle spasms are clues to this deficiency. Magnesium is predominantly an intracellular ion, so blood level testing is of little value. Oral preparations are acceptable for maintenance, but most need additional, parenteral dosing: 1 gram IV or IM at least once a week until neuromuscular irritability has cleared.

From Lyme Disease Treatment Guidelines - Piroplasmosis (Babesiosis):
Piroplasms are not bacteria, they are protozoans. Therefore, they will not be eradicated by any of the currently used Lyme treatment regimens. Therein lies the significance of coinfections- if a Lyme patient has been extensively treated yet is still ill, suspect a piroplasm.

From Lyme Disease Treatment Guidelines - Course During Therapy

It has been observed that symptoms will flare in cycles every four weeks. It is thought that this represents the organism's cell cycle, with the growth phase occurring once per month. As antibiotics will only kill bacteria during their growth phase, therapy is designed to bracket at least one whole generation cycle. This is why the minimum treatment duration should be at least four weeks. If the antibiotics are working, over time these flares will lessen in severity and duration. The very occurrence of ongoing monthly cycles indicates that living organisms are still present and that antibiotics should be continued.


http://www2.lymenet.org/domino/file.nsf/UID/guidelines

I would like to make one comment. The author of this article observes that "it is possible to see latent infections reactivate, especially viruses of the Herpes type." I wonder if latent infections such as measles and chicken pox could also be reactivated and cause some of the skin rashes that can occur with Lyme disease.

Last edited by wasabi; 03-16-2007 at 12:42 PM. Reason: add excerpts, comment
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Old 03-16-2007, 11:29 AM   #3
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Default Lyme Disease and Eye Problems

Here is an eye problem that seems to be caused by Lyme disease. I know that specialized scans show that I have a thinner, larger than normal "cup" where the optic nerve attaches to the retina. My optometrist says that because of this, I am borderline glaucoma even though the intraocular pressue in my eyes is well within normal. Is it possible that this problem is being caused by Lyme disease which causes increased intracranial pressure? I'm waiting to hear back from my optometrist.

I wonder if a lesser amount of increased intracranial pressure (not enough to cause persistent headaches, but chronic) causes the tinnitus that is often associated with Lyme disease. And where does this increased intracranial pressure come from? Is it an inflamation due to the bacteria, or could it be caused by increased muscle tension along the jaws, neck and spine, or both?

http://pediatrics.aappublications.or...ull/112/6/e477
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Old 03-16-2007, 04:17 PM   #4
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Default Lyme Disease and Dogs

Here is some good information about Lyme disease and dogs. This article contains a very good description about the deer tick and it's involvement in Lyme disease.

http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_lyme_disease.html
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Old 03-16-2007, 04:24 PM   #5
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Default Possible Reasons for Persistence of Lyme Disease

Reasons for the Survival and Persistence of Lyme Disease Bacteria (cystic forms, blebs, L-forms, etc.) -
A Bibliography with Highlighted Full Abstracts

Could the following researchers have discovered reasons for the survival of the Lyme disease bacteria in some patients even though seemingly adequate antibiotics were used for treatment?

http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/...e-reasons.html
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Old 03-17-2007, 02:38 PM   #6
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Default Lyme Disease and Alcohol

I don't think it is good for Lyme disease sufferers to consume alcohol. This was Wildcondor's experience (See the link to Wildcondor's story on my post to the Lyme Update Thread) This is my experience. I have been getting better for the past 8 days or so using sea buckthorn in addition to my regular supplements. Last night I had about 9 ounces of wine (Being gluten intolerant, having a couple of glasses of wine on Friday evenings is a special treat). This morning, the numbness on the left side of my face was definitely worse that the day before.

It makes sense. Among other things, Lyme disease produces neurotoxins that are bad for your brain, your nerves and your liver. Alcohol is also a neurotoxin that is bad for your brain, your nerves and your liver.

I guess I will just have to give up alcohol in addition to gluten and dairy
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Old 03-18-2007, 12:37 AM   #7
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Default Lyme Disease and Corticosteroids

One should be cautious about using corticosteroids if one is suffering from Lyme disease because corticosteroids can suppress the immune system. This is not what you want to happen if your body is fighting an infection:

http://www.lymenet.de/literatur/steroids.htm
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Old 03-20-2007, 07:03 PM   #8
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Default Lyme Disease and Aspartame

Interesting article. I think people should avoid aspartame regardless of its possible connection to Lyme disease:

http://www.bio.net/bionet/mm/toxicol...er/003043.html

Here is an article on excitotoxins in general:

http://www.whale.to/a/blaylock5.html

Last edited by wasabi; 03-20-2007 at 07:35 PM. Reason: Added link to article on excitotoxins in general
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Old 03-21-2007, 12:31 AM   #9
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Default Ehrlichiosis

Ehrlichiosis is one of the bacteria that can be transmitted by the deer tick in Lyme disease. Here is a short article about ehrlichiosis:

http://www.dhpe.org/infect/ehrlichiosis.html
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Old 03-21-2007, 12:50 PM   #10
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Default Babesia

Babesia is parasitic infection that can be transmitted by the deer tick in Lyme disease. It is a protozoa that infects red blood cells and causes malaria like symptoms. Here are some relevant sites:

The Tick Research Laboratory - Human Babesiosis:
http://riaes.cels.uri.edu/resources/...b/babesia.html

Brief general information with a picture of babesia infected blood cells:
http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/VBDP/babesia.htm

Infection with a Babesia-Like Organism in Northern California:
http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/332/5/298

Babesia Infections in Switzerland?
http://www.ilads.org/swiss.html

There is also a book by James Schaller, MD titled - "The Diagnosis and Treatment of Babesia"
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