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Old 03-21-2007, 09:29 PM #11
mfreeze38 mfreeze38 is offline
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Default what are "mild" symptoms?

I see several people here saying that they had "mild ms" for years - what is mild? Virginia, for example, says that she had mild symptoms for over 25 years, I think - how did you know? What things did you feel during those 25 years that you finally decided were actually mild MS symptoms? Did you feel mild things every day or did you instead, simply have infrequent attacks every year or two, but those were acute, and nothing inbetween? So does mild mean mild symptoms, but the symptoms are there all of the time, or does mild mean mild attacks when they occurred - or does mild mean infrequent attacks, but severely acute when they occur? Or something different? Clearly, a measure of EDSS is one criteria.

I think that I have seen different people indicating mild in different ways. Would unobtrusive and non-disabling symptoms on a daily basis be considered mild?
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Old 04-04-2007, 12:01 PM #12
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For me, I consider my MS to be mild right now because I only have minor lasting effects from prior attacks. For instance, I feel some pain and numbness when anything very hot or very cold hits the lower half of the right side of my body. I also can have some fatigue, slight sensory problems, and brief periods of mild vertigo. I have had MS for about 14 years now (diagnosed at age 19), and in the past have had a small number of major attacks with coordination problems, vertigo, partial paralysis of my writing hand, and migraine headaches. So I guess I would still call my MS mild because I have only very little disability and have not had that many attacks (probably 10 or less). I don't know if that is the technical way to describe my MS, but it is how I describe it :-)
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Old 04-26-2007, 12:31 AM #13
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My neuro hates that term (benign) If you have a tumor removed and it's benign, that's the end of the story. Not so with MS, as we all know.

I much prefer, along with my neuro, the term mild MS at present. Who knows what will come tomorrow, next week, next year. That's why I'm on a CRAB drug to attempt to slow things down. So far my lesion load has not increased. I'd like to think that it's working, but who knows.

I consider myself mild mainly because I can walk without difficulty, and I have no eye problems. However, cognitive deficits can be just as disabling.
Even though I am considered mild, I am on Rebif because the MS hit me very hard in cognition.

Contrary to previous reports, researchers are now saying that cognitive deficits can be one of the first signs of MS. Before, they said that cognitive deficits only came later in the disease.

I am one of those "but you look so good" folks. It's only when we converse that they see my searching for words, losing my train of thought, and etc.
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Old 04-29-2007, 01:36 PM #14
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Default From the NMSS's Sourcebook...

http://www.nationalmssociety.org/sit...book_prognosis

Prognosis

From The MS Information Sourcebook, produced by the National MS Society.

It is generally very difficult to predict the course of MS. The disorder varies greatly in each individual but most people with MS have a normal life expectancy. Nevertheless, a few patients with very severe disability may die prematurely of infectious complications (such as pneumonia) so that the overall life expectancy is only 95% of normal.

There are some guidelines that may be used to infer prognosis. Several studies have shown that people who have few attacks in the first several years after diagnosis, long intervals between attacks, complete recovery from attacks, attacks that are sensory in nature (i.e., numbness, tingling, visual loss), and nearly normal neurological examinations after 5 years tend to do better. People who have early symptoms of tremor, in-coordination, difficulty in walking, or who have frequent attacks with incomplete recoveries, early development of neurological abnormalities, or more lesions on MRI early on, tend to have a more progressive disease course.

People with MS Can Expect One of Four Courses of Disease
MS tends to take one of four clinical courses, each of which might be mild, moderate, or severe:

* A relapsing-remitting course (RRMS), characterized by partial or total recovery after attacks (also called exacerbations, relapses, or flares). This is the most common form of MS. Approximately 85% of people with MS initially begin with a relapsing-remitting course.

* A relapsing-remitting course that later becomes steadily progressive is called secondary-progressive MS (SPMS). Attacks and partial recoveries may continue to occur. According to some natural history studies, of the 85% who start with relapsing-remitting disease, more than 50% will develop SPMS within 10 years; 90% within 25 years. More recent natural history studies (perhaps because of the use of MRI to assist in the diagnosis) suggest a more benign outlook that these numbers suggest. Nevertheless, many patients with RRMS do develop SPMS ultimately.

* A progressive course from onset without any attacks is called primary-progressive MS (PPMS). The symptoms that occur along the way generally do not remit. Ten percent of people with MS are diagnosed with PPMS, although the diagnosis usually needs to be made after the fact-when the person has been living for a period of time with progressive disability but no acute attacks.

* A progressive course from the outset, with obvious, acute attacks along the way, is called progressive-relapsing MS (PRMS). This course is quite rare, occurring in only 5% of people with MS.

Researchers are currently trying to identify more precise indicators of the prognosis or predicted disease activity.

----

Realize too that the NMSS says MS begins at time of diagnosis; not time of first symptom(s). If I went by first symptoms I've had MS 35 years. But since diagnosis I've had MS 14 years; now SPMS.
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Old 05-06-2007, 10:55 PM #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 0357 View Post
Realize too that the NMSS says MS begins at time of diagnosis; not time of first symptom(s). If I went by first symptoms I've had MS 35 years. But since diagnosis I've had MS 14 years; now SPMS.

Not exactly sure why the National MS Society uses that concept, but, I imagine it is for statistical purposes.

Personally, I believe a percentage of the planet's population is born with a sensitivity to certain factors, or, a combination of certain factors - factors such as stress, toxins, viral infections. When a "good enough" catalyst comes into the picture, our hypersenstivity to that particular catalyst rears its ugly little head. It is then that our MS actually begins. It's degree of progression is also affected by stress, toxins, viral infections. Again, this is just my personal opinion.

MS is now being dxd in kids as young as two years of age, according to a neuro on the Montel program on MS that was on a week or so ago.

Zia
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Old 05-07-2007, 05:18 AM #16
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No, not THAT "word"! lol. I have such a bitterness with it. I suppose it might be because after 13 years with a "relatively easy" ride with MS (was in denial and able to blame all my sx's on something else).

Well late 2005 I went looking for a Neuro since I did not have one. One said "No MS" , another "Post Viral Infection" , and the next said "Benign-no need for treatment" Ok, sorry for all the 's, but not 5 months later did I have a relapse that has completely turned my life around I have 2 small children I can barely take care of, in pain all day every day, etc...

Anyway, just hate the word! IMHO, NOONE can know if your case will be mild or not, hence the fact that MS is unpredictable...
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Old 05-07-2007, 10:47 AM #17
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Default Jena

Yes, isn't MS unpredictable!! I started out my first 4 years with MS with one acute attack after another. My neuro, who was trained at a MS Clinic, dx. me with PRMS.

Since September of '96 I haven't had an attack and things have settled down so since the start in '92. Now they say I started out as RRMS which turned now to SPMS.

Sorry MS has affected you so. Hang in there...

Last edited by 0357; 05-07-2007 at 11:18 AM.
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