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Old 03-10-2012, 07:21 PM   #1
EddieF
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Default Pine Bark?

Do a search & read what it might be possible healer for. I see it's a powerful antioxident & may also help circulation for venous insuf.
I have a rash on my leg which is why I payed attention when Dr Oz mentioned it for such, but it looks to be worth a try for more.
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:49 AM   #2
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Default Cures Heart Failure!!!

I have found many, many things that Pine Brark can "cure". The most amazing is when I told my doctor a Board Certified Cardiologist that it could just about cure heart failure.

I showed him this abstract and in my next office visit he said that he "tried it" and that he did not get the 22.4% increase in ejection fraction.

He only saw a 20% increase.

That means the heart was pumping about 20% more volume per beat.

He was very pleased.

The minimum effective dose is 150mg but I think 100 mg twice a day is best.

As a side-effect it helped raise my HDL from 41 to 76.

jackD

p.s. I have done much research on this stuff and I will list some of my findings later.

http://home.ix.netcom.com/~jdalton/P...l%20levels.pdf

Panminerva Med. 2010 Jun;52(2 Suppl 1):21-5.

Investigation of Pycnogenol® in combination with coenzymeQ10 in heart failure patients (NYHA II/III).

Belcaro G, Cesarone MR, Dugall M, Hosoi M, Ippolito E, Bavera P, Grossi MG.
SourceIrvine3 Labs, Department Biomedical Sciences, Chieti-Pescara University, Pescara, Italy. cardres@abol.it

Abstract
AIM: In this study we investigated benefits of a Pycnogenol - coenzyme Q10 combination (PycnoQ10) taken as an adjunct to medical treatment in stable heart failure patients. The aim of this single-blinded, 12-week observational study was to provide functional parameters such as exercise capacity, ejection fraction and distal edema.

METHODS: The essential element for inclusion was a stable level of heart failure within the past three months and stable NYHA class II or III (6 months). The heart failure management was in accordance with AHA guidelines for "best treatment." The treatment and control groups were comparable at baseline. The mean age of the PycnoQ10-treated patients was 61.3+/-7.1 years and 62.1+/-3.7 in the control group. All patients were taking medication and most patients (>75%) used three or more drugs for heart failure treatment. There were two dropouts in the PycnoQ10 treatment group and 6 in the control group (5 NYHA III patients).

RESULTS: Nine PycnoQ10 treated patients (out of 32) and 3 (out of 21) taking placebo improved NYHA class. Systolic and diastolic pressure as well as heart rate and respiratory rate were significantly lowered with PycnoQ10 as compared to the control group (P<0.05). No significant changes were observed in controls. Heart ejection fraction increased by 22.4% in the treatment group (P<0.05) versus 4.0% in controls. Walking distance on treadmill increased 3.3-fold in PycnoQ10 treated patients (P<0.05) but marginally improved in the control group. Distal edema decreased significantly in PycnoQ10 treated patients and only slightly in controls.

CONCLUSION: The association of Pycnogenol and CoQ10 may offer an important therapeutic option with a very good tolerability that improves heart failure management without side effects.

PMID:20657530[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Lipids. 2002 Oct;37(10):931-4.

Supplementation with a pine bark extract rich in polyphenols increases plasma antioxidant capacity and alters the plasma lipoprotein profile.

Devaraj S, Vega-López S, Kaul N, Schönlau F, Rohdewald P, Jialal I.

SourceLaboratory for Atherosclerosis and Metabolic Research, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, Sacramento, California 95817, USA.

Abstract
Pycnogenol (PYC), an extract of French maritime pine bark (Pinus pinaster), is a potent antioxidant with potential health benefits. Its bioavailabilty has previously been shown by urinary excretion studies of constituents and metabolites of PYC. The aim of this study was to test the effect of PYC supplementation on measures of oxidative stress and the lipid profile in humans. Twenty-five healthy subjects received PYC (150 mg/d) for 6 wk. Fasting blood was collected at baseline, after 3 and 6 wk of supplementation, and again after a 4-wk washout period. After 6 wk of supplementation with PYC, a significant increase in plasma polyphenol levels was detectable, which was reversed after the 4-wk washout phase. The antioxidant effect of PYC was demonstrated by a significant increase in oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) in plasma throughout the supplementation period (P < 0.05). The ORAC value returned to baseline after the 4-wk washout period. Moreover, in addition to its antioxidant effects, PYC significantly reduced LDL-cholesterol levels and increased HDL-cholesterol levels in plasma of two-thirds of the subjects. While the LDL changes reversed during washout, the HDL increase did not. There was no significant difference in LDL oxidizability or plasma lipid peroxides following PYC supplementation. Hence, following oral supplementation in humans, PYC significantly increases antioxidant capacity of plasma, as determined by ORAC, and exerts favorable effects on the lipid profile.

PMID:12530550[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:57 AM   #3
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Default MS & pine bark (pycnogenol).

It lowers MMP-9s. MMP-9s make holes in the BBB and enter brain and cut meylin in little pieces. NOT THE CAUSE OF MS!!! But the way the damage is done.

http://home.ix.netcom.com/~jdalton/Yongrev.pdf

jackD


Quote:
Free Radic Biol Med. 2004 Mar 15;36(6):811-22.

Antioxidant activity and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases by metabolites of maritime pine bark extract (pycnogenol).

Grimm T, Schäfer A, Högger P.
SourceInstitut für Pharmazie und Lebensmittelchemie, Bayerische Julius-Maximilians-Universität, Würzburg, Germany.

Abstract
The procyanidin-rich maritime pine bark extract Pycnogenol has well-documented antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. After oral administration of Pycnogenol two major metabolites are formed in vivo, delta-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-gamma-valerolactone (M1) and delta-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-gamma-valerolactone (M2). We elucidated the effects of these metabolites on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and determined their antioxidant activity to understand their contribution to the effects of maritime pine bark extract. We discovered strong inhibitory effects of M1 and M2 toward the activity of MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9. On a microgram-per-milliliter basis both metabolites appeared more active than Pycnogenol. The metabolites were more effective than their metabolic precursor (+)-catechin in MMP inhibition. On a cellular level, we detected highly potent prevention of MMP-9 release by both metabolites, with concentrations of 0.5 microM resulting in about 50% inhibition of MMP-9 secretion. M1 was significantly more effective in superoxide scavenging than (+)-catechin, ascorbic acid, and trolox, while M2 displayed no scavenging activity. Both metabolites exhibited antioxidant activities in a redox-linked colorimetric assay, with M1 being significantly more potent than all other compounds tested. Thus, our data contribute to the comprehension of Pycnogenol effects and provide a rational basis for its use in prophylaxis and therapy of disorders related to imbalanced or excessive MMP activity.

PMID:14990359[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2008 Feb;19(1):42-51. Epub 2007 Jun 19.

Quote:

MMPs in the central nervous system: where the good guys go bad.


Agrawal SM, Lau L, Yong VW.

SourceHotchkiss Brain Institute and the Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Abstract
Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are expressed in the developing, healthy adult and diseased CNS. We emphasize the regulation of neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis by MMPs during CNS development, and highlight physiological roles of MMPs in the healthy adult CNS, such as in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory.

Nonetheless, MMPs as "the good guys" go bad in neurological conditions, likely aided by the sudden and massive upregulation of several MMP members.

We stress the necessity of drawing a fine balance in the treatment of neurological diseases, and we suggest that MMP inhibitors do have therapeutic potential early after CNS injury.

PMID:17646116[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Last edited by jackD; 03-11-2012 at 07:52 PM.
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Old 03-11-2012, 07:51 PM   #4
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This abstract below shows that they have known for over 10 years the positive health effects that pine bark extract (Pycnogenol) has for a wide variety of medical problems.

I have posted some of the more recent abstracts.

I started taking the Pycnogenol because my doctor had added the "calcium channel blocker" drug Nifedipine to control my high blood pressure drugs but It caused the edema in my foot to get much worse.

He was quite surprised when I showed him this abstract that indicates that the control this problem for this drug quite well.

jackD

Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2006 Oct;12(4):440-4.

Control of edema in hypertensive subjects treated with calcium antagonist (nifedipine) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors with Pycnogenol.

Belcaro G, Cesarone MR, Ricci A, Cornelli U, Rodhewald P, Ledda A, Di Renzo A, Stuard S, Cacchio M, Vinciguerra G, Gizzi G, Pellegrini L, Dugall M, Fano F.
SourceDepartment of Biomedical Sciences, Irvine2 Vasc Lab, G D'annunzio University. Cardres@abol.it

Abstract
The presence of edema in different phases and stages of essential hypertension may be due to antihypertensive treatment. Some drugs may cause edema by inducing vasodilatation, increasing the capillary exchange surface and capillary filtration. Pycnogenol has an important anti-edema effect in diabetic microangiopathy and chronic venous insufficiency. This 8-week study evaluated capillary filtration in 2 comparable treatment groups with hypertension treated with a calcium antagonist (nifedipine) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor to define its efficacy in preventing edema caused by antihypertensives. A significant decrease in filtration was observed in the Pycnogenol groups.

Pycnogenol controls this type of edema, it helps to prevent and limit long-term damage in the microcirculation in hypertensive patients, and allows the dose of anti-hypertensive drugs to be reduced in most patients.
PMID:17000888[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Quote:
Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2002 Apr;40(4):158-68.

A review of the French maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol), a herbal medication with a diverse clinical pharmacology.
Rohdewald P.
SourceInstitute Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany.

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: An increasing body of evidence indicates that Pycnogenol (PYC), a standardized extract of French maritime pine bark, has favorable pharmacological properties. This is a review of studies with both PYC and components of the preparation, that have helped to elucidate target sites and possible mechanisms for activity in men.

METHODS: Studies appearing in peer reviewed literature, as well as results presented at international meetings not yet available as published papers, are included in this review. Additional data from published sources in German and French languages that are not widely available are also included.

RESULTS: Chemical identification studies showed that PYC is primarily composed of procyanidins and phenolic acids. Procyanidins are biopolymers of catechin and epicatechin subunits which are recognized as important constituents in human nutrition. PYC contains a wide variety of procyanidins that range from the monomeric catechin and taxifolin to oligomers with 7 or more flavonoid subunits. The phenolic acids are derivatives of benzoic and cinnamic acids. The ferulic acid and taxifolin components are rapidly absorbed and excreted as glucuronides or sulphates in men, whereas procyanidins are absorbed slowly and metabolized to valerolactones which are excreted as glucuronides. PYC has low acute and chronic toxicity with mild unwanted effects occurring in a small percentage of patients following oral administration. Clinical studies indicate that PYC is effective in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency and retinal micro-hemorrhages. PYC protects against oxidative stress in several cell systems by doubling the intracellular synthesis of anti-oxidative enzymes and by acting as a potent scavenger of free radicals. Other anti-oxidant effects involve a role in the regeneration and protection of vitamin C and E. Anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo in animals. Protection against UV-radiation-induced erythema was found in a clinical study following oral intake of PYC. In asthma patients symptom scores and circulating leukotrienes are reduced and lung function is improved. Immunomodulation has been observed in both animal models as well as in patients with Lupus erythematosus. PYC antagonizes the vasoconstriction caused by epinephrine and norepinephrine by increasing the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Dilation of the small blood vessels has been observed in patients with cardiovascular disease, whereas in smokers, PYC prevents smoking-induced platelet aggregation and reduces the concentration of thromboxane. The ability to inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme is associated with a mild antihypertensive effect. PYC relieves premenstrual symptoms, including abdominal pain and this action may be associated with the spasmolytic action of some phenolic acids. An improvement in cognitive function has been observed in controlled animal experiments and these findings support anecdotal reports of improvement in ADHD patients taking PYC supplements.

CONCLUSIONS: There is much evidence showing that PYC has beneficial effects on physiological functions. Results from ongoing clinical research are required to confirm and extend previous observations.

PMID:11996210[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE
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Last edited by jackD; 03-12-2012 at 12:08 AM.
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Old 10-25-2017, 12:14 PM   #5
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I can't seem to let go of my interest in MS even though I lost my sister to it last year. On the Pycnogenol I got on it in 1995 and it was life changing for my health and stayed with it for a year and then went to grape seed extract. I brought Pycnogenol and LDN and what I could to my sister's attention but she didn't listen. Venous insufficiency is one big area that it works on.

Another supp I am going back to is Sphingoln for nerve damage from a hip surgery, it did a lot for me and then I've been off it for a couple yrs and nerve issues came back. So I ordered it again and in the reviews some with MS gave it a favorable review.

I know you all know so much but now and then we need reminders. Take care.
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OA onset at 18, now 79. Fibro onset at 61, Hip Replacement "mess" 72 (nerve damage, IT band damage, shorter leg). Otherwise, pretty good health.

Most important supplement: grape seed extract
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Old 10-25-2017, 12:40 PM   #6
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PS: Reading JackD's words on Pycnogenol and it "Could" prevent heart failure.

When I heard a lecture on it back in 1995, we were even told it MAY prevent cancer(s). There are many many studies printed now on this OPC for some cancers. That was the MAIN reason I got on it.

Gums and Eyes are in good condition and I know it's due to this/these OPC's.

There is so much out there to help us and we can miss so much if not brought to our attention by whomever. Not going to hear it from the MD's.
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OA onset at 18, now 79. Fibro onset at 61, Hip Replacement "mess" 72 (nerve damage, IT band damage, shorter leg). Otherwise, pretty good health.

Most important supplement: grape seed extract
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Old 03-02-2018, 04:34 PM   #7
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I was hoping there would be comments on Pine Bark or Grape Seed Ex. Here's a clinic in Calif. and they offer alternatives to their MS patients. Including Grape Seed Ex. Often wonder IF my sister had taken it???? Would things have been different...she lost her battle in Dec 2016.

Multiple Sclerosis
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OA onset at 18, now 79. Fibro onset at 61, Hip Replacement "mess" 72 (nerve damage, IT band damage, shorter leg). Otherwise, pretty good health.

Most important supplement: grape seed extract
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Old 03-11-2018, 01:47 PM   #8
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Go figure 1st time looking up this old ms site in long long time.
Pine b still in drawer, never took it. Anyone try it?
I still swim and 100 other things, my ms has progressed a lot.
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Old 03-11-2018, 02:59 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieF View Post
Go figure 1st time looking up this old ms site in long long time.
Pine b still in drawer, never took it. Anyone try it?
I still swim and 100 other things, my ms has progressed a lot.
Oh goodness, and I thought I was talking to someone who takes Pine Bark or Grape Seed Extract which are OPC's. I have such a strong feeling on these for everything that is wrong in our bodies.
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Most important supplement: grape seed extract
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