Parkinson's Disease Tulip


advertisement
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-24-2007, 04:18 PM #1
Stitcher's Avatar
Stitcher Stitcher is offline
Magnate
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,136
15 yr Member
Stitcher Stitcher is offline
Magnate
Stitcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,136
15 yr Member
Default Psychic distress common with Parkinson's dementia

Psychic distress common with Parkinson's dementia

2 hours, 21 minutes ago
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070124/..._dementia_dc_1

People with dementia associated with Parkinson's disease often suffer from a range of psychiatric and neurological symptoms such as anxiety, agitation and hallucinations, researchers report.

Dr. D. Aarsland, of Stavanger University Hospital, Norway, and colleagues examined the pattern of neuropsychiatric symptoms in 537 patients with Parkinson's disease-related dementia, assessed using the 10-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory.

The subjects were an average of 73 years old, had had Parkinson's disease for some 10 years, and had been demented for about 2 years.

Overall, 89 percent of them had at least one neuropsychiatric symptom, and 77 percent had two or more, the team reports in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry.

The most common symptoms were depression, apathy, anxiety, and hallucinations. In general, patients with more severe dementia and advanced Parkinson's disease exhibited more neuropsychiatric symptoms.

The investigators noted five distinct patterns or clusters of symptoms. These included a "mild" cluster with few symptoms; a "mood" cluster with high scores on depression and anxiety; an "apathy" cluster with high scores on apathy and low scores on other items; an "agitation" cluster with high scores on agitation and high total scores; and a "psychosis" cluster with high scores for delusions and hallucinations.

Patients in the psychosis and agitation clusters had the most advanced disease, and these two groups were also associated with the highest distress scores among caregivers.

Classifying patients into these subgroups has "potential treatment implications," Aarsland's team concludes. They also suggest that there may be "specific neurobiological changes underlying the different neuropsychiatric clusters."

SOURCE: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, January 2007.
__________________
You're alive. Do something. The directive in life, the moral imperative was so uncomplicated. It could be expressed in single words, not complete sentences. It sounded like this: Look. Listen. Choose. Act. ~~Barbara Hall

I long to accomplish a great and noble tasks, but it is my chief duty to accomplish humble tasks as though they were great and noble. The world is moved along, not only by the mighty shoves of its heroes, but also by the aggregate of the tiny pushes of each honest worker. ~~Helen Keller
Stitcher is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote

advertisement
Old 03-04-2024, 03:26 AM #2
jim.raflores jim.raflores is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2024
Posts: 2
jim.raflores jim.raflores is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2024
Posts: 2
Default

Are you aware of any studies for those with Parkinson's disease-related dementia who have undergone Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery? Though not recommended at the time (due to cognitive decline/mild dementia), my wife underwent DBS to address her debilitating physical symptoms. Ten years later, I/We certainly don't regret the surgeries (1 per side) as she immediately saw improvements in her movements/flexibility/dyskinesia all while reducing her medications. However, hallucinations/anxiety/confusion have spiked up in the past couple years. As such, I'd be interested in hearing from those in a similar situation (Parkinson's disease-related dementia who have undergone Deep Brain Stimulation). Thanks!
jim.raflores is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote
Old 03-04-2024, 10:25 PM #3
Jomar's Avatar
Jomar Jomar is offline
Co-Administrator
Community Support Team
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 27,686
15 yr Member
Jomar Jomar is offline
Co-Administrator
Community Support Team
Jomar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 27,686
15 yr Member
Default

What PD meds is she on?
Meds and combos of meds especially taken long term and advancing age, can all add up to halucinations, confusion, anxiety..
May or may not be relatable to DBS.
Jomar is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote
Old 03-05-2024, 04:48 AM #4
jim.raflores jim.raflores is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2024
Posts: 2
jim.raflores jim.raflores is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2024
Posts: 2
Default

Appreciate the quick response! Her regular meds include: Neupro patch, Carbidopa-Levodopa ER, Rasagiline, Wellbutrin, as well as Clonazepam and Melatonin before bedtime.
jim.raflores is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote
Old 03-05-2024, 05:16 PM #5
Jomar's Avatar
Jomar Jomar is offline
Co-Administrator
Community Support Team
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 27,686
15 yr Member
Jomar Jomar is offline
Co-Administrator
Community Support Team
Jomar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 27,686
15 yr Member
Default

Drugs & Medications A to Z - Drugs.com

You can look up drugs and interactions on that site .
Carb/Lev can cause side effects over long time use also
You can search meds info on NT in past posts .

https://www.neurotalk.org/search.php
Jomar is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:16 AM.

Powered by vBulletin • Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise v2.7.1 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2024 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
 

NeuroTalk Forums

Helping support those with neurological and related conditions.

 

The material on this site is for informational purposes only,
and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment
provided by a qualified health care provider.


Always consult your doctor before trying anything you read here.