Go Back   NeuroTalk Support Groups > >

Parkinson's Disease Tulip

Possible Treatments for TODAY's PWP

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-16-2008, 03:18 PM   #21
cris
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3
Default stem cell treatments

I'm new here and I dont know if you talked about it in the past - stem cell treatment.
what about treat PD with stem cells?
I just start to read about it, and I find this success stories at the frc-family research council.


what you think ?
cris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2008, 01:19 PM   #22
quince
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1
Default

Could you give me the dosages you are suing with the current formulas?
quince is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2008, 01:24 PM   #23
sept08
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 41
My Mood: Possible Treatments for TODAY's PWP
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Max19BC View Post
Hello,
I'm new to this group, not sure if I'm doing this posting right, anyway here it goes.
"Brain Gym" I've been practicing it for about 4 years now. I don't do it every day, and it only takes about 15 minutes, but their's lots of different exercises so you can, so do as many as you like and do different ones each time.
When I lived in Calgary, I belonged to the young onset pd group. Once of the facilitators put together a course on "Brain Gym". She told us that pd'ers practicing this have shown improvements. I don't remember where she got the following info, but it really sounded interesting: "By practicing Brain Gym, you will stimulate new areas of the brain to create dopamine" Sounds good enough for me, so I signed up for the course.

So what is "Brain Gym"
Info taken from: brainworksnaturally.com
Brain Gym® consists of various combinations of 26 targeted movements. It grew out of clinical studies started in 1969 by Paul Dennison. In the more than thirty years since, research has shown that application of Brain Gym® provides significant improvement in concentration, memory, reading, organization skills, language and number skills, writing, speaking, athletic performance and more. It is used worldwide in more than 90 countries, in 40 different languages. In 1989, in response to "The Nation At Risk" study, The National Learning Foundation selected Brain Gym® as a recommended learning strategy, and continued to rate it highly throughout the 1990’s.

Who Benefits ?
Students with special needs, ADD, ADHD, autism, dyslexia, patients with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, and people with learning disorders have all shown improvement using brain gym. Change may be remarkably immediate or take place in a period of days or weeks, according to the extent of the problem, but profound differences are usually noticed by the clients themselves. Check into research studies for more information.
Anyone who wants to think better, clearer and faster can benefit. Academic, physical and personal goals are met using Brain Gym®. No matter what your age, it is never too late to activate! Learn simple ways to energize, meet challenges and optimize learning potential.

The best book I found on "Brain Gym" is called:
Brain Gym for Business by Gail & Paul Dennison
cost around $18.00 at Amazon.com
I couldn't find a book that specificallly for pd'ers

These exercises are fun and easy to do.
They are mostly cross-overs. Like an infant learning how to crawl, this is a cross over. You will be working both sides of the brain, creating new or strengthing the links between them.
These exercises will improve your balance, concentration, problem solving, handwriting, reading, speaking, memory, writing skills, focus, improves posture, releases stress, etc.

Here is an example of one of these exercises.
Called: "The Cross Crawl"
Taken from: Brain Gym for Business by Gail & Paul Dennison
You will need to be standing. Start by marching in place, alternate touching each hand to the opposite knee. Continue during the course of 4 to 8 complete, relaxed breaths. A variation of this movement can be done sitting down.
The Cross Crawl activates both brain hemispheres simultaneously. It engages the brain for coordinating visual, auditory, and kinesthetic abilities, thus improving such skills as lisitening, reading writing and memory.

I've had pd for 7 years now, and something I'm doing has dramatically slowed down the progression. As the months go by, I've been getting better, maybe "Brain Gym" has something to do with it. Who knows. It couldn't hurt. I'm also taking mucuna. Been taking it for over a year now with excellent results.

Sincerely.
Max
Hi Max,

Just ordered Munuca for for the first time because I heard so much about it, all good. Can you give me some information on how you started and how much you took, you know, the details.

I believe in taking natural drugs.
I believe in exercise. I set up my own regime that works great for me.

I too was getting better, until the Dystenesa set in and when I saw my doctor he said that I was being overdosed and reduced my Levocarb to half of what I was taking. 200 to 100 for 4 times a day.

But I'm still not happy and I want to get off as many drugs as I can, that's why the Mucuna.

thank you
C
sept08 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2008, 02:15 PM   #24
WilliamD
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 4
Default Fasting and a vegetarian diet

Quote:
Originally Posted by lindylanka View Post
For anyone coming here for the first time, and needing some answers on self-help, especially with regard to maintaining flexibility John Argue's book 'Parkinson's Disease and the Art of Moving' is a good resource. Based on both western and eastern ideas on body work it takes you through a process of developing skills that will help you keep your independence, and minimise some of the movement difficulties that PD brings. In case you think I am giving this book some good advertising space, I have never had anything to do with John Argue, just recognise a good thing when I see it!

Tai Chi is also pretty good, and one of the forms of exercise that comes recommended for PD'ers. Look for a teacher who is non competitive and will take things at an easy pace........... A good teacher will help you get your stance right early on, and teach you to step out using a heel-toe movement, which helps with falls and poor balance, getting out of hesitation and freezes etc. It's relaxing and good fun, and helps maintain good memory too ....

Lindy
Have there been any results from extended fasts and any radical vegetarian diet
WilliamD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2009, 09:39 AM   #25
seeppo
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3
Default Parkinson ear implants

Hi
Any experiences in using dr Werth¨s ear implant acupuncture
seeppo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2009, 09:41 AM   #26
seeppo
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3
Default inplant acupuncture needle - Dr werth titanium needle

HI

I am new to this forum but would like to know if anyone has experiences about dr Werth inplant acupuncture implant. see Werth acupuncture for ever needle

regards

Seppo, Finland
seeppo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2009, 01:40 PM   #27
Bobcmoc
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 2
Default John Argue

Quote:
Originally Posted by lindylanka View Post
For anyone coming here for the first time, and needing some answers on self-help, especially with regard to maintaining flexibility John Argue's book 'Parkinson's Disease and the Art of Moving' is a good resource. Based on both western and eastern ideas on body work it takes you through a process of developing skills that will help you keep your independence, and minimise some of the movement difficulties that PD brings. In case you think I am giving this book some good advertising space, I have never had anything to do with John Argue, just recognise a good thing when I see it!

Tai Chi is also pretty good, and one of the forms of exercise that comes recommended for PD'ers. Look for a teacher who is non competitive and will take things at an easy pace........... A good teacher will help you get your stance right early on, and teach you to step out using a heel-toe movement, which helps with falls and poor balance, getting out of hesitation and freezes etc. It's relaxing and good fun, and helps maintain good memory too ....

Lindy
Argue's book and the people he has trained do a wonderful job in helping one relearn. I took 3 quarters of the Hoag (So. CA)class and will go back again when they have room. Bob
Bobcmoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2009, 12:06 AM   #28
TrishaPDX
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 58
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by seeppo View Post
HI

I am new to this forum but would like to know if anyone has experiences about dr Werth inplant acupuncture implant. see Werth acupuncture for ever needle

regards

Seppo, Finland
Hi Seppo,

Am wondering if you proceeded with Werth's implant acupuncture? My friend Jan wants to learn about other's experiences.

Kind regards,
Trisha
TrishaPDX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2011, 10:24 AM   #29
dopadoc
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bergen Co, NJ USA
Posts: 12
Thumbs up ICD and food

I have residual of ICD (impulse control disorder) remaining...urge to eat pretty much when pramipexole in therapeutic range. Specifically crave the bad stuff : sugar,salt,fat...basically think fast food. Do you know of anyone who's actually tried this?
dopadoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2011, 03:59 PM   #30
reverett123
In Remembrance
 
reverett123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,772
My Mood: Possible Treatments for TODAY's PWP
Default Being paranoid does not necessarily mean you are wrong

If it is solely fast food, it might be interesting to consider how an entire society came to be addicted

Quote:
Originally Posted by dopadoc View Post
I have residual of ICD (impulse control disorder) remaining...urge to eat pretty much when pramipexole in therapeutic range. Specifically crave the bad stuff : sugar,salt,fat...basically think fast food. Do you know of anyone who's actually tried this?
__________________
Born in 1953, 1st symptoms and misdiagnosed as essential tremor in 1992. Dx with PD in 2000.
Currently (2011) taking 200/50 Sinemet CR 8 times a day + 10/100 Sinemet 3 times a day. Functional 90% of waking day but fragile. Failure at exercise but still trying. Constantly experimenting. Beta blocker and ACE inhibitor at present. Currently (01/2013) taking ldopa/carbadopa 200/50 CR six times a day + 10/100 form 3 times daily. Functional 90% of day. Update 04/2013: L/C 200/50 8x; Beta Blocker; ACE Inhib; Ginger; Turmeric; Creatine; Magnesium; Potassium. Doing well.
reverett123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OT - Today's Quote befuddled2 Bipolar Disorder 0 05-22-2010 02:27 PM
Today's The Day Alffe Survivors of Suicide 16 10-09-2008 06:16 PM
And from today's NY times-- glenntaj Gluten Sensitivity / Celiac Disease 2 05-08-2007 10:31 AM
Today's fun question! MomOTwins Autism 4 10-24-2006 06:02 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:00 AM.
Brought to you by the fine folks who publish mental health and psychology information at Psych CentralMental Health Forums

The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment
provided by a qualified health care provider. Always consult your doctor before trying anything you read here.


Powered by vBulletin • Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO v2.0.31 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise v2.7.1 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

All posts copyright their original authors • Community GuidelinesTerms of UsePrivacy Policy