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Possible Treatments for TODAY's PWP

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Old 04-14-2011, 04:03 PM   #31
reverett123
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Born in 1953, 1st symptoms and misdiagnosed as essential tremor in 1992. Dx with PD in 2000.
Currently (2011) taking 200/50 Sinemet CR 8 times a day + 10/100 Sinemet 3 times a day. Functional 90% of waking day but fragile. Failure at exercise but still trying. Constantly experimenting. Beta blocker and ACE inhibitor at present. Currently (01/2013) taking ldopa/carbadopa 200/50 CR six times a day + 10/100 form 3 times daily. Functional 90% of day. Update 04/2013: L/C 200/50 8x; Beta Blocker; ACE Inhib; Ginger; Turmeric; Creatine; Magnesium; Potassium. Doing well.
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Old 11-09-2012, 11:53 PM   #32
daniscott
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Default Caffeine

I see a few good studies mentioned in this forum, but I haven't seen any mention of caffeine or adenosine blockers. Findings from a longitudinal study examining the effects of caffeine found that people who drink a moderate amount of caffeine (or more) per day were less likely to develop Parkinson's disease, or for it to develop later in life. In response to that, several studies were done which strongly suggest that caffeine does indeed slow the progression of Parkinson's disease. Since caffeine works as an adenosine blocker, several studies were done to test the effects of adenosine blockers to slow the progression of Parkinson's. I've read several of these studies, and they all lead to the conclusion that adenosine blockers in general can reduce the amount of l-dopa needed to control Parkinson's, and can slow progression of the disease. All the studies I read have copyrights which expressly forbid posting them to online forums, so I can't post them here. If you're interested, you can search for scholarly articles about adenosine, caffeine and Parkinson's disease.
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Old 11-10-2012, 06:23 PM   #33
shetawk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daniscott View Post
I see a few good studies mentioned in this forum, but I haven't seen any mention of caffeine or adenosine blockers. Findings from a longitudinal study examining the effects of caffeine found that people who drink a moderate amount of caffeine (or more) per day were less likely to develop Parkinson's disease, or for it to develop later in life. In response to that, several studies were done which strongly suggest that caffeine does indeed slow the progression of Parkinson's disease. Since caffeine works as an adenosine blocker, several studies were done to test the effects of adenosine blockers to slow the progression of Parkinson's. I've read several of these studies, and they all lead to the conclusion that adenosine blockers in general can reduce the amount of l-dopa needed to control Parkinson's, and can slow progression of the disease. All the studies I read have copyrights which expressly forbid posting them to online forums, so I can't post them here. If you're interested, you can search for scholarly articles about adenosine, caffeine and Parkinson's disease.
You can post up to 3 links to give a break to those typing with one finger on the hand that works.
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Old 01-20-2013, 04:09 PM   #34
ol'cs
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Default I think that adenosine blockers are a current target

For pharmaceutical companies, looking for further exploration of small molecule therapy for PD. but just enough already with the palliatives, what we need is cell replacement therapy. It it terrible that DBS is the neuro's last words. In today's worlds of biochemical knowledge it is a shame that we are not ten years ahead on this.
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Old 08-10-2013, 12:19 PM   #35
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I second your opinion.
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Old 08-26-2013, 12:14 AM   #36
David H. Blatt
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Default challenge conventional expectations about Parkinson's disease

To reverett123
i have read some of your 3600 posts -- and I agree with your basic attitude that its up to us to do waht we can rather than waiting for researchers to make the miracle breakthrough they keep telling us they will make if only we donate more to fund their research.

In 1997 I was 41 years old when I was diagnosed wiith Parkinson's disease, in 2010 I began leading exercise classes for people with Parkinson's disease, and in 2013 I participated in my first masters slalom and giant slalom ski races.

Vigorous exercise can enable us to beat expectations.

David


Quote:
Originally Posted by reverett123 View Post
Exciting research breakthroughs are all well and good for future generations, but if you are reading this they probably aren't going to arrive in time to help you, today's PWP.

However, there are things available today that have enough research behind them to warrant consideration. I propose this thread as a sticky to keep track of these so that they are not lost.

The type of treatments I am talking about carry varying amounts of risk and no one should assume anything about these. This is serious stuff and the decisions you make about them will determine the course of your life. Even choosing to ignore them will be a momentous one.

This is the place for promises not of just borrowing time with neuroprotection but of putting things to rights with neurogenesis. But that is where risk comes in. Things that trigger regrowth of nervous tissue could also trigger overgrowth and resulting tumors for example.

This is not to say that one should avoid risk - one cannot. And bluntly put, doing nothing but the treatments offered by our neuros has a clear end - and it is not pleasent. Each of us must decide for ourselves with the best information available to us. I hope this thread will provide a place to gather that information.
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Old 08-26-2013, 01:13 AM   #37
e-barua@hotmail.com
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Exclamation Zucchini Flower - Zandopa.

This ifo dates back to 2006 and indicates above helps PWP. 2013 and nobody has mentioned anything about it. what has gone wrong?
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:20 PM   #38
mouka
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What has gone wrong is that no one seems to know what really causes
PD. Dopamine deficiency certainly plays a big role, but it's something else that triggers everything.
I am afraid it might be too late for us to hope for a cure.
Stem cell research is probably the most promising lead. But Bush has pushed it back 10 or 20 years. Let's hope the Europeans can take over and help us all.
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Old 01-13-2014, 12:22 PM   #39
chrishageseth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David H. Blatt View Post
To reverett123
i have read some of your 3600 posts -- and I agree with your basic attitude that its up to us to do waht we can rather than waiting for researchers to make the miracle breakthrough they keep telling us they will make if only we donate more to fund their research.

In 1997 I was 41 years old when I was diagnosed wiith Parkinson's disease, in 2010 I began leading exercise classes for people with Parkinson's disease, and in 2013 I participated in my first masters slalom and giant slalom ski races.

Vigorous exercise can enable us to beat expectations.

David
David. I'm with you. Exercise hard enough to sweat.
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Old 02-14-2014, 06:09 PM   #40
zanpar321
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David. I'm with you. Exercise hard enough to sweat.
Just read a book Younger Next Year which discusses diet and exercise and indicates that when exercising, you need to sweat to get the most benefit.

Also, another glimmer of hope discusses New research which:

shows that, when properly manipulated, a population of support cells found in the brain called astrocytes could provide a new and promising approach to treat Parkinson's disease. These findings, which were made using an animal model of the disease, demonstrate that a single therapy could simultaneously repair the multiple types of neurological damage caused by Parkinson's, providing an overall benefit that has not been achieved in other approaches.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0128184809.htm
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