Parkinson's Disease Tulip


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Old 11-02-2020, 09:27 PM #1
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Default The Parkinson's revolution fits on a single sheet of paper.

Wise and brave neurologists have dared -it is not easy to get out of the dominant discourse- to leave us in books and to recommend us in scientific studies these true treasures. Changes that should always be supervised by the neurologist of each patient. Not a step backwards but with the necessary prudence.

I am not a neurologist but I am a historian, a digital journalist and I can search the libraries and databases to find and read the compassionate and sufficiently heterodox and brilliant neurologists: Karobath, Birkmayer, Fahn, Jenner, Mattson... Some of the most respected names in the last 50 years of orthodox Neurology about Parkinson's.



Every day, but always consulting the neurologist first:

- Vitamin D3 above 1200 IU per day as Suzuki in 2013
that totally stopped Parkinson's during the year of
the study -UPDRS scale-, although already in 2018 Hiller
dared to use 10,000;

- the three B vitamins against homocysteine recommended by neurologist Dr. Ahlskog and some more (1000-2000 mcg B12, 2.5 mg B9 and
25 mg of B6). Serum homocysteine level above 20 Ķmol/L
was accompanied by an 8.64 times increased risk of developing
Parkinson's disease (Saadat 2018);

- vitamin B2 above or near 90 mg per day of the experiment
of Coimbra in 2003. At 6 months, there was a 44-71% motor improvement (three participants out of 19 who completed the study recovered 100% -modification of the scoring system of Hoehn and Yahr-. Schoenen used 200-400 mg at day for migraines with children and adults without the slightest problem (Schoenen 1994, 1998);

- vitamin C above 3 grams per day as used by Fahn in 1992, produced a delay in the need for medication of 2.5 years. No studies were done with higher doses or with the much more potent liposomal or parenteral forms. Numerous studies show that it enhances the benefits of levodopa and reduces its adverse effects (Nagayama 2004, Zhao 2019).

"Some things from the past are gone
but others open a gap to the future
and they are the ones I want to rescue."

Mario Benedetti
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Old 11-07-2020, 07:34 AM #2
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Hi Here-Now,

I though I'd contribute some thoughts from Michael Greger's Book; How not to Die. This is my summary Chapter 14; How not to Die of Parkinson's Disease. I would be interested in your comments and any changes you think I should make.

What are the causes of Parkinson's Disease and how can we reduce our risk?

1. Head Trauma
2. Industrial Pollutants
3. Diet.

1. Head trauma.

It's repeated head trauma, rather than a one off concussion that puts people at risk. Professional boxers and contact sports enthusiasts are at most risk.

2. Industrial Pollutants

There have been reported Parkinsonís cases among people who have worked for years in pesticide production plants. There may be a link between dairy product intake and risk for Parkinsonís disease, caused perhaps by low levels of neurotoxic chemicals in cheese and banned pesticides in contaminated dairy products. Hexachlorobenzine a pesticide banned 50 years ago is still found in meat and fish and dairy. PCBs a set of banned chemicals used in electrical insulation is still found in fish, fish oils eggs and dairy and some meats. It is least found in the bottom of the food chain, in plants.

Beta-carboline neurotoxins, which can be found in beef, chicken, pork, and fish, have been linked to cases of Parkinsonís disease, tremor, addiction, and cancer. A USDA study found about one in six U.S. lambs infected with the parasite toxoplasma, which has been linked to risk for Parkinsonís. Excess iron intake and nitrites, found in cured meats, appear to be linked with Parkinsonís. BMAA, a neurotoxin that can be found in seafood may be linked to risk for Parkinsonís disease, ALS, and Alzheimerís disease.

3. Diet

Parkinson's is linked with the accumulation of heavy metals in the brain. Autopsy studies have also found elevated levels of heavy metals in brain tissue.
Which foods contribute the most heavy metals?

1. Arsenic - Poultry and Tuna
2. Lead - Dairy
3. Mercury - Seafood and Fish oils. The oceans are essentially humanity's sewer. Everything eventually flows into the sea.

Reducing Dioxin Intake

Dioxins are highly toxic pollutants that accumulate in the fat of animal tissue. 95% of human exposure comes from eating animal products. The dioxins are a product of contanimated animal feeds.
In 1997 the FDA called on feed manufacturers to stop using dioxin-tainted ingredients. However tests in 2013 found that in catfish, 96% of tested samples still contained dioxins. How to avoid dioxin intake? The Institute of Medicine suggests trimming fat from meat and avoiding recycling animal fat into gravy. However reducing intake of meat would appear most prudent.

Milk

Neurotoxic chemicals like Tetrahydroisoquiniline a compound used to induce parkinsonism in primates in laboratory studies is found in low concentrations in cheese. A lifetime of consumption however may explain the elevated levels found in the brains of Parkinson's patients.

One paper describes a "clear-cut" link between dairy and Parkinson's. A suggestion is that galactose, the sugar in milk is the culprit. Those who are unable to detoxify galactose may suffer from neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's and Huntington's disease.


How can we reduce our Risk?

Pesticicides such as DDT have been long been banned but persist in the environment and creep up the food chain into animal fats we eat. Researchers have found that ďvegans were considerably less polluted than omnivoresĒ including Dioxins and heavy metals. Those with plant based diets had levels of mercury in heir hair 10 times lower than fish eaters. However those starting a plant based diet, avoiding meat fish dairy and eggs, found their mercury, lead and cadmium levels dropped significantly within 3 months.

Simply living or working in high spray areas increase your risk. The use of common household pesticides such as insect sprays or anti bacterial sprays are also associated with greater risk. Therefore lower your exposure to them.

If pesticices are killing your brain cells , what can you do to prevent thatÖ

Berries

Certain Phytonutrients called favanoids found in fruit and vegetables have protective effects. Berries in particular counter the effects of pollutants. Blueberries and Strawberries most effectively. Also apples for men. Regular intake of cooked or sprouted beans may also help lower risk against neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinsonís, Lou Gehrigís disease, and Alzheimerís.

Constipation

Constipation was noted by James Parkinson to be associated with PD. His pateints would never complain of being thirsty. The idea is that the longer the neurotoxic chemicals are held in the body the longer they are absorbed. The soltion is to drink more water and take in more fibre.An oat/porridge breakfast would be ideal.

Coffee

Coffee has been show to protect against Parkinsonís. Caffiene has also shown to be effective in improving movement symptoms within 3 weeks.


To reduce the risk of Parkinsonís reduce the consumption of meat, fish and dairy products including eggs in your diet. Stop taking fish oils, replace with algae oils or Flax seed for sources of Omega 3. Take a diet rich in water and fibre to avoid constipation. Minimise the use of sprays at home.

Many modern drugs, including those used to treat Parkinsonís, are derived from plants. A whole foods, plant-based diet, may help in the treatment of Parkinsonís symptoms.
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Old 11-17-2020, 07:26 PM #3
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Hello, Atticus.

Sorry for the delay in answering you.

I see the approach as too rigid, conventional.

Depending on how far you are willing to go, I would add one thing or another.
I'm writing my book and it's hard for me to disconnect.

Coffee

Coffee prevents Parkinson's in an amazing way (2-3 cups daily in regular consumers):

- a lower risk of suffering from it, between 20 and 70% (Sobel 2000, Ascherio 2001);
- if developed, it will appear on average 8 years later, from 64 to 72 (Benedetti 2000);
- not consuming coffee increases the risk five times (Ross 2000, Hu 2007).

Caffeine is very similar to some iron chelators and itīs a vasoconstrictor of the barrier that protects the brain (although it is a peripheral vasodilator, which is why it relieves asthma).

And it is part of the most amazing cocktail of preventive habits known so far: coffee, tobacco and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs - not aspirin - by 87% (Powers 2008).

I don't know if that's more or less what you'd be interested in.

Other aspects to be dealt with: homocysteine. A level higher than 20 micromoles, increases 8.64 times the risk of Parkinson's (Saadat 2018).
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