Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD and CRPS) Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes Type I) and Causalgia (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes Type II)(RSD and CRPS)

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Old 04-12-2011, 02:52 PM #1
stressedout stressedout is offline
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Default what do you tell people or potential employer

Hi everyone. Been really busy so haven't been on much. I really want to work. I was a dog groomer, really good at what I did. I cannot do that anymore since the RSD in my left hand/arm. I have the scs and much of the pain is quited but I still have swelling, some hypersensitivity, difficulty opening my fingers (started ot yesterday for that) and a really bad tremor. What do you tell people? If I am interviewed for a job what would/should and how do I explain my problems to them? I am still on meds (Lyrica, Cymbalta, Mobic plus asthma and allergy meds) and am forgetful and will forget words mid sentence or the right word. I really want life back but what do I do? I am on unemployment, have an A.A.S in early childhood education but don't see how I'll make the money I made before.
Patty
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Swatgen27 (04-12-2011)
Old 04-12-2011, 06:04 PM #2
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Originally Posted by stressedout View Post
Hi everyone. Been really busy so haven't been on much. I really want to work. I was a dog groomer, really good at what I did. I cannot do that anymore since the RSD in my left hand/arm. I have the scs and much of the pain is quited but I still have swelling, some hypersensitivity, difficulty opening my fingers (started ot yesterday for that) and a really bad tremor. What do you tell people? If I am interviewed for a job what would/should and how do I explain my problems to them? I am still on meds (Lyrica, Cymbalta, Mobic plus asthma and allergy meds) and am forgetful and will forget words mid sentence or the right word. I really want life back but what do I do? I am on unemployment, have an A.A.S in early childhood education but don't see how I'll make the money I made before.
Patty
I am working PT and I just tell them the truth. I don't go into a lot of detail. I answer ?'sw/limited info. but I don't lie. Again, it all demends on what kind of job FT or PT. if it's full time then you have to worry about if they are going to cover you for health insurance, they may think you will be a liability. It's hard to judge. In education I know the rules are stricter. Maybe ask a fellow worker you can trust in the same industry and see what they think.

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Old 04-13-2011, 07:45 AM #3
dealingwithtos dealingwithtos is offline
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I wouldn't tell them a thing.

Interview for the position. Show them why they should hire you and your qualifications.

I made that mistake years ago when I was upfront and honest that I was pregnant. I wasn't hired for positions that I was even over-qualified for. As soon as I didn't tell them I was pregnant - I was hired.

Being too honest gives them a reason to be discriminating. Even though it's illegal, it's hard to prove when you're interviewing.
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SandyRI (04-13-2011)
Old 04-13-2011, 11:10 AM #4
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I have thought of this issue as well. I think for a potential employer I would not say anything until I had to. For ex at the time if I could not do something because of my condition. I feel with an employer if you stated health problems especially since many are unfamiliar with rsd it will impact getting hired. Especially in this day when so many people are looking for jobs.
Now people in my life if a friend or family I tell them what I face and try to be open and honest.
What type of job will you look for? Maybe still with animals but in a different line of work?
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Old 04-13-2011, 04:11 PM #5
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When interviewing you shouldn't have to tell them anything...just interview for the position. They are not allowed to ask about any disabilities and can only take that into consideration if you need accomodations that would put them under undue hardship. That said...you need to be honest. If your condition could affect attendance, number of hours you can work per shift, etc and the company will be to accomodate those things then you need to tell them that. All interviews I have ever conducted involve questions like, "Is there anything that will afftect your ability to come to work on time every day?" or "Can you lift at least 40lbs?" Etc. In those cases, you need to be honest. But there is no need to explain the details of your condition unless you are expecting them to make special accomodations. And if you will need special accomodations, you should think about what you will need beforehand so that you can have an open and honest discussion with the employer. Not sure if that helps or not.

With people I already work with and anyone else who asks, I generally answer any questions but keep it limited unless they really want to know the details. This condition is too hard to really explain to someone who is just asking a casual question.
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Old 04-13-2011, 09:23 PM #6
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Hi Patty

I am bedridden and work from home. I sell office supplies, and even though i am busting my but sending emails and calling clients, my sales are low and im in jeopardy of losing my job. i use to be in the top ten women on the east coast in sales...now im way below the bottom. alot has to do with our company mostly selling to the govt and since there wasnt a budget, people couldnt order...but i dont like to make excuses. I blame this on the RSD. i cant remember things, i get nervous and sometimes stutter. im not at the top of my game. BUT IM TRYING, i am keeping myself busy and praying that God will help me get my sales up and i dont lose this job. My boss has been awesome and supportive.

so thats my story now to you. whatever you are applying for, just make sure it doesnt involve life or death situations. nothing where you might have to make fast decisions...nothing where you will be under alot of pressure.
dont set yourself up to fail based on what your abilities use to be.
i said to my boss the other day " I use to be the best salesperson, i wish you knew me then" he said to me, i use to be 25 i wish you knew me then.

so be good to yourself. apply for things based on your abilities right now, pain and all. find something that will make you happy. if you like little kids, be a rept. at a pediatricians office. make it easy on yourself is my point.
gentle hugs
Lori




Quote:
Originally Posted by stressedout View Post
Hi everyone. Been really busy so haven't been on much. I really want to work. I was a dog groomer, really good at what I did. I cannot do that anymore since the RSD in my left hand/arm. I have the scs and much of the pain is quited but I still have swelling, some hypersensitivity, difficulty opening my fingers (started ot yesterday for that) and a really bad tremor. What do you tell people? If I am interviewed for a job what would/should and how do I explain my problems to them? I am still on meds (Lyrica, Cymbalta, Mobic plus asthma and allergy meds) and am forgetful and will forget words mid sentence or the right word. I really want life back but what do I do? I am on unemployment, have an A.A.S in early childhood education but don't see how I'll make the money I made before.
Patty
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Wishing you a day of pain free movement that turns into forever!
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Old 04-14-2011, 02:21 PM #7
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Thank you everyone. I have been looking. Right now it's obvious that I have a problem with my left hand and arm because it shakes so bad and it's hard to use it without dropping things. I figure I would like something like a receptionist. I've done it before so know what it entails. Just wish I could make what I used to. I've gotten used to the side effects of this and the meds and take lots of notes. I guess I just get down when interviewing and they find out, especially since it's workers comp. Just would love to do what I used to and have my life back.
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Old 04-14-2011, 06:27 PM #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stressedout View Post
Thank you everyone. I have been looking. Right now it's obvious that I have a problem with my left hand and arm because it shakes so bad and it's hard to use it without dropping things. I figure I would like something like a receptionist. I've done it before so know what it entails. Just wish I could make what I used to. I've gotten used to the side effects of this and the meds and take lots of notes. I guess I just get down when interviewing and they find out, especially since it's workers comp. Just would love to do what I used to and have my life back.
I hear ya about getting back to work. I have been going out of my mind just being off work temporarily. I see myself as someone who will always want to work, even if the type of work has to change at some point in the future.
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