Go Back   NeuroTalk Support Groups > >

Helpful Information & Links

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-28-2006, 07:06 PM   #1
Bobbi
Senior Member
 
Bobbi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,851
My Mood: Helpful Information & Links
Arrow Helpful Information & Links

Healing For Survivors of Suicide
http://www.survivingsuicide.com/

Grief after Suicide
http://www.cmha.ca/bins/content_page.asp?cid=3-101-103

The Grief Response
Experienced by Survivors of Suicide
by Barbara Rubel, MA
http://www.griefworkcenter.com/newpage3.htm

Responding to Suicide Survivors
http://www.save.org/coping/responding.html

LOSS - Loved Ones Suicide Survivors
http://www.healingafterloss.org/halo/sos.html

Sibling Survivors of Suicide
http://www.siblingsurvivors.com/

SAVE•Suicide Awareness Voices of Education
http://www.save.org/

Suicide Survivor Sites
http://suicidal.com/depressionlinks/soslinks/

SoBS - Survivors Of Bereavement by Suicide
http://sobs.admin.care4free.net/

Survivors of Suicide
http://www.survivorsofsuicide.com/
Bobbi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2006, 12:52 AM   #2
bizi
Legendary
 
bizi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: cajun country, lafayette Louisiana
Posts: 18,684
My Mood: Helpful Information & Links
Smile

http://www.metanoia.org/suicide/

http://www.samaritans.org.uk

www.befrienders.org

http://www.jaredstory.com/suicide.html
If you have lost a loved one to suicide:
For information on a Suicide Survivors support group in your area call
American Association of Suicidology
1-202-237-2280
www.yellowribbon.org
Found this website about what suicide does to those left behind. I hope it makes people who are considering suicide think.

http://www.save.org/
www.journeyofhearts.org
www.mhsanctuary.com/suicide
http://www.healthyplace.com/Communit...son/index.html
A website primarily for men who are suffering from depression or are suicidal: www.theblackdog.net
www.befrienders.org

------------------
www.lifeline.org.au/

here is the ultimate of ultimate LINKS- there are over 25 links in this site, all dealing with SOS ( i think this is a good link to keep, for everyone that comes here) http://www.healthfind.org/Health/Men...SupportGroups/
here is yahoo’s SOS http://groups.yahoo.com/group/surviv...1?viscount=100
this has a chat but you will have to sign up to be a member, http://www.survivorsofsuicide.com/questions.html
here is a link to a SOS message board from ICQ http://web.icq.com/groups/group_details?gid=1491880



BOOKS!!!
Alffe Highly
recommends this new book:
after daniel A Suicide Survivor's Tale by moira farr
Moira Farr discovered Daniel Jones' body on Valentine's Day, 1994. Struggling with deep depression, he had killed himself using a method clearly outlined in the bestselling book Final Exit. Six years later, in an account both deeply personal and thoughtfully political, Farr reflects on Daniel's suicide and its consequences. After Daniel is not a sensational tell-all, a self-help book on grieving, or an academic review of suicide theories. It is one woman's story - beautifully, lyrically told - of her own experiences and her realization that answers come both from within and from looking at suicide in a wider social context. After Daniel reaches beyond suicide survivors to all those who embrace the sacredness of life and love.

***************
My Son....My Son...... by Iris Bolton
This is the story of Iris Boltons journey through the grief of losing her son Mitch to suicide. She was the Director of The Link Counselor Center at the time of his death.
It is a profoundly moving book...she dares us to grieve and challenges us to survive. It is a gift of hope for those of us left behind.
***********
SUICIDE, The Forever Decision by Paul Quinnett
This book is written for people who are thinking about killing themselves and for those people who know, love, or counsel them.
It is written in the style of him as the counseler he is....having a conversation with you about staying alive.
**************
Silent Grief by Christopher Lukas and Henry Seiden
This is an important book about healing. A practical book about coming to terms with the silence that follows suicide...and how that silence is the enemy. How survivors must be willing to talk about it and to find someone who will listen. They must understand that both talking and listening requires a certain amt. of skill, a skill that can be acquired; and they must learn to respond. To respond means to take charge of ones life....to grow.
************
Night Falls Fast Understanding Suicide
by Kay Redfield Jamison
Kay Jamison's strength is in the gutsy way she has made her disease (she is bi polar) her life's work. She has a brilliant ability to convey the joys and anguish of manic-depression. This is a beautifully written book.
*************************
His Bright Light by Danielle Steel
This is the true story of her son Nick Traina who struggled with bi polar illness.
Perhaps only a writer of this distinction could convery what it is like to try to cope with a chld with a severe psychiatric disorder...this is a book about what we can do...as parents, as physicians, as human beings.
This is a haunting book...a gripping memoir of a son lost.
*********************
No Time to Say Goodbye by Carla Fine
Carla Fine brings suicide survial from the darkness into the light, speaking frankly and with compassion about the overwhelming feelings of confusion, guilt, shame, anger, and loneliness that are shared by all survivors. Drawing on her own experience and the experiences of the many other survivors with whom she has spoken.
Survivors will find much comfort in these pages...Ms.Fine reassures readers that they are not alone.

------------------
__________________

.

This is harriet, my sweet baby girl.....
heavy sigh.....
.



one day at a time....

Last edited by bizi; 11-04-2006 at 12:25 AM. Reason: added books from before!
bizi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2007, 07:48 PM   #3
Alffe
Young Senior Elder Member
 
Alffe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 11,290
Default

http://www.mhcdc.org/Resources/SOS/TheDividingLine.html
__________________

.
Alffe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2007, 05:42 AM   #4
Alffe
Young Senior Elder Member
 
Alffe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 11,290
Default

http://suicide.com/suicidecrisiscenter/incrisis.html
__________________

.
Alffe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2007, 04:28 PM   #5
Lara
Legendary
 
Lara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Far North Queensland, Australia
Posts: 10,263
Default

http://www.suicidepreventionaust.org/
Suicide Prevention Australia
- numerous links including
National Help lines and
Crisis lines State by State.
Lara is offline   Reply With Quote
"Thanks for this!" says:
Alffe (05-07-2008)
Old 05-09-2007, 07:36 PM   #6
moose53
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 761
Arrow

I've collected a bunch of bookmarks that are available to everyone:
http://public.murl.com/moose53/HEALT...HOLOGY/SUICIDE
(press the [page-down] key 4 times.

Barb
moose53 is offline   Reply With Quote
"Thanks for this!" says:
Alffe (05-07-2008)
Old 02-12-2008, 12:26 PM   #7
Alffe
Young Senior Elder Member
 
Alffe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 11,290
Default

http://www.brcic.org/un_index.html
__________________

.
Alffe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 08:42 PM   #8
bizi
Legendary
 
bizi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: cajun country, lafayette Louisiana
Posts: 18,684
My Mood: Helpful Information & Links
Default

http://www.dbsalliance.org/site/Page...?pagename=home


http://www.dbsalliance.org/site/Page...uicide_suicide

What You Can Do to Help Someone

Among the many things you can do to help someone who is depressed and may be considering suicide, simply talking and listening are the most important. Do not take on the role of therapist. Often, people just need someone to listen. Although this might be difficult, the following are some approaches that have worked for others:
  • Express empathy and concern.
    Severe depression is usually accompanied by a self-absorbed, uncommunicative, withdrawn state of mind. When you try to help, you may be met by your loved one’s reluctance to discuss what he or she is feeling. At such times, it’s important to acknowledge the reality of the pain and hopelessness he or she is experiencing. Resist the urge to function as a therapist. This can ultimately create more feelings of rejection for the person, who doesn't want to be "told what to do." Remain a supportive friend and encourage continued treatment.
  • Talk about suicide.
    Talking about suicide does not plant the idea in someone’s head. Your ability to explore the feelings, thoughts and reactions associated with depression can provide valuable perspective and reassurance to your friend or loved one who may be depressed. Not everyone who thinks of suicide attempts it. For many, it's a passing thought that lessens over time. For a significant number of people, however, the hopelessness and exaggerated anxiety brought on by untreated or under-treated depression may create suicidal thoughts that they can’t easily manage on their own. For this reason, take any mention of suicide seriously.

    If someone you know is very close to suicide, direct questions about how, when and where he or she intends to commit suicide can provide valuable information that might help prevent the attempt. Don’t promise confidentiality in these circumstances. It’s important for you to share this information with the individual’s doctor.
  • Describe specific behaviors and events that trouble you.
    If you can explain to your loved one the particular ways his or her behavior has changed, this might help to get communication started. Compounding the lack of interest in communication may be guilt or shame for having suicidal thoughts. Try to help him or her overcome feelings of guilt. If there has already been a suicide attempt, guilt over both the attempt and its failure can make the problem worse. It’s important to reassure the individual that there’s nothing shameful about what they are thinking and feeling. Keep stressing that thoughts of hopelessness, guilt and even suicide are all symptoms of a treatable, medical condition. Reinforce the good work they’ve done in keeping with their treatment plan.
  • Work with professionals.
    Never promise confidentiality if you believe someone is very close to suicide. Keep the person’s doctor or therapist informed of any thoughts of suicide. If possible, encourage them to discuss it with their doctor(s) themselves, but be ready to confirm that those discussions have taken place. This may involve making an appointment to visit the doctor together or calling the doctor on your own. Be aware that a doctor will not be able to discuss the person’s condition with you. You should only call to inform the doctor of your concern.

    Whenever possible, you should get permission from your loved one to call his or her doctor if you feel there’s a problem. Otherwise, it could be seen as "butting in" and may worsen the symptoms or cause added stress. Of course, if you believe there is a serious risk of immediate self-harm, call his or her doctor. You can work out any feelings of anger the person has towards you later.
  • Stress that the person's life is important to you and to others.
    Many people find it awkward to put into words how another person's life is important for their own well-being. Emphasize in specific terms to your friend or loved one how his or her suicide would devastate you and others. Share personal stories or pictures to help remind your loved one of the important events in life you’ve shared together.
  • Be prepared for anger.
    The individual may express anger and feel betrayed by your attempt to prevent their suicide or help them get treatment. Be strong. Realize that these reactions are caused by the illness and should pass once the person receives proper treatment.
  • Always be supportive.
    People who have thought about, or attempted, suicide will most likely have feelings of guilt and shame. Be supportive and assure them that their actions were caused by an illness that can be treated. Offer your continued support to help them recover.
  • Take care of yourself.
    It’s not uncommon for friends and family members to experience stress or symptoms of depression when trying to help someone who is suicidal. You can only help by encouraging and supporting people through their own treatment. You cannot get better for them. Don’t focus all of your energy on the one person. Ask friends and family to join you in providing support and keep to your normal routine as much as possible. Pay attention to your own feelings and seek help if you need it. (top)
__________________

.

This is harriet, my sweet baby girl.....
heavy sigh.....
.



one day at a time....
bizi is offline   Reply With Quote
"Thanks for this!" says:
Alffe (05-07-2008), Burntmarshmallow (04-20-2008)
Old 08-07-2008, 01:53 PM   #9
Nik-key
Senior Member
 
Nik-key's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: NH
Posts: 1,733
My Mood: Helpful Information & Links
Default

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, also has a huge sections on Surving Suicide Loss

http://www.afsp.org/index.cfm?fuseac...84379C813F8D93

In that section they have a section on Survivors of Suicide Day .. this year it will be held on Saturday, Nov. 22. I just registered to watch the program on my computer.
__________________
********************************************

More Than One Soul Dies In A Suicide

.

********************************************



.
Nik-key is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2008, 01:55 PM   #10
Nik-key
Senior Member
 
Nik-key's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: NH
Posts: 1,733
My Mood: Helpful Information & Links
Default

AFSP, also have walks to honor those we lost and to help raise money to prevent suicide. http://www.outofthedarkness.org/
__________________
********************************************

More Than One Soul Dies In A Suicide

.

********************************************



.
Nik-key is offline   Reply With Quote
"Thanks for this!" says:
Alffe (08-07-2008), Burntmarshmallow (08-07-2008)
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Helpful Information About Lyme Disease wasabi Lyme Disease, Shingles and Other Microbial Conditions 44 02-09-2016 03:24 PM
Helpful information for new posters here Rabbit Epilepsy 4 12-11-2008 11:10 PM
Helpful Information about Alzheimer's wasabi Alzheimer's Disease 4 05-14-2007 02:20 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:05 PM.
Brought to you by the fine folks who publish mental health and psychology information at Psych CentralMental Health Forums

The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment
provided by a qualified health care provider. Always consult your doctor before trying anything you read here.


Powered by vBulletin • Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO v2.0.31 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

All posts copyright their original authors • Community GuidelinesTerms of UsePrivacy Policy