Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Thoracic Outlet Syndrome/Brachial Plexopathy. In Memory Of DeAnne Marie.


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Old 08-03-2007, 10:53 PM #1
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Lightbulb We Were Soldiers, Movie of Julie from Texas Dad

Mel Gibson stars in this 1965 Vietnam movie, MEl got to know her Dad and portrayed him well from what I recall . Big sit down dinners in their home even.

I am mentioning this as I just noticed it is playing now on TNT and if you can rent it or search for it on your local channel it is a great movie.

Julies Dad is a real HERO!!!!! and mega person.
Di
Looks like the typos is Ok now, lol

edit done. <3 curious

Last edited by DiMarie; 08-03-2007 at 11:29 PM. Reason: edit per request
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Old 08-04-2007, 01:06 AM #2
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wow! I read the book and then watched the movie.... disturbing realistic movie. Di is right - he IS a hero. So, Julie's dad, Thank You Sir.
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Old 08-04-2007, 08:50 AM #3
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I am not a big war movie person. I am more a comedy, lite fare person. My motto is that I have enough stress and horror in my life I don't want to see it in the movies or on TV. BUT, my husband and son are GREAT fans of this type of movie. I don't mean to be ignorant but who is Julie? Do I know her by her site name? Thank you Julie's Dad! Both my brothers-in-law were in Vietnam. They do not discuss it. Every male member of my and my husbands family, including my husband have served our Country Proudly. Cudo's to every man/woman serving our Country and God Bless them and bring them home safely. No matter your take on the war, it is Our people we support.
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Old 08-04-2007, 09:18 AM #4
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Default Here's to all the Hero's

that have fought for our country. Every day I thank God he spared my hubby who was in the Air Force during Nam doing rescue missions via a helicopter. Years later we adopted a Vietnamese baby who is the Love and the Joy of our lives. God Bless our Troops.
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Old 08-04-2007, 10:11 AM #5
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[B]Lisa LI am so happy to hear you had a good outcome. And great about your daughter. I have a cousin from Korea who is a beautiful, wonderful woman. My poor mother-in-law spent a long time not hearing from one of her sons. She kept calling the Dept of Marines and no information was provided. One day, she had a knock at her door. It was a Marine. She was horrified, only to find out they wanted to tell her, "in person" that her son was ok and had been unable to communicate due to his orders. Not a knock anyone wants. But at least hers was a good one.

My husband has a huge scar on his back. When we were dating he told me he had been shot and stabbed in Grenada. What a liar!! He was lookin for alittle sympathy! Men can be very pathetic!

He did serve our country in the army for 4 years as an MP and an undercover narcotics agent for the FBI. When we met, I decided I probably had some friends I couldn't introduce him to.!! Ha Ha. just joking.

Linda
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Old 08-04-2007, 10:29 PM #6
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Smile Julie

Julie from Texas, her old TOS handle, has been a TOS family member for many years, but often has breaks. I do email her at times.

I remember when the movie was being made her Dad had to be 80'ish, and Mel just loved being with the family and picking up his traits.

I hope one day Julie finds the forum here and can say hello and thanks to her Dad from all of us.
Di

"WE WERE SOLDIERS" Mrs. JULIE MOORE passes on...
The MOORE Family ^ | 4/18/2004 | The MOORE Family
Julia Compton Moore

Career Army Wife

Mrs. Julia Compton Moore, 75, whose extraordinary care for the wives and families of fallen soldiers was portrayed in the Mel Gibson movie, "We Were Soldiers," died in the arms of her family in Auburn, Alabama on Sunday, April 18th. The cause of death was cancer.

Born at Fort Sill, Oklahoma on February 10th 1929, Julia ("Julie") Compton Moore was the only child of Army Colonel Louis J. Compton and Elizabeth Boon Compton. Since the age of 12, Mrs. Moore has sent the men she loved to war. Her father fought in Europe in World War II, her husband was wounded in Korea and Vietnam, and one of her sons fought with the 82nd Airborne Division in Panama and the Gulf War. Her early and lifelong experience with separation and the risk of loss in war provided her a unique empathy with, and understanding of, the lives of families in war.

Mrs. Moore was married under crossed sabers in 1949 to Hal Moore, who later commanded the first battalion, 7th Cavalry in the battle of the Ia Drang Valley in Vietnam in 1965. The Ia Drang was the first major engagement between the forces of the United States and the forces of the People's Army of Vietnam. Over 1,000 Vietnamese were killed, at the price of 121 American lives. The impact of this battle at home in Columbus Georgia, where Julie lived with her five young children, was depicted in the 2002 Paramount release, "We Were Soldiers," and brought to millions of Americans the carnage of combat and its terrible toll on families. Notices of combat deaths in Columbus were delivered to wives and families typically isolated in small apartments, trailer parks, and one-room walk-ups. Mrs. Moore challenged and stopped the Army's impersonal practice of delivering these notices by taxi. Assuming the responsibility required by her position as the commander's wife, she personally comforted each bereaved family and attended every funeral of every soldier lost in combat under her husband's command. Pressed by this example, the Army instituted the practice of delivering compassionate notices through uniformed personnel, and built support networks for the families of slain soldiers. These practices have become standard throughout the military.

In 2002, Mrs. Moore wrote:

"I was a stay-at-home Mom, volunteering with the Red Cross and Army Community Service. My main love and focus has always been the Army family and especially our Child Care Centers.

"Not very exciting when I write it down but I have loved every minute (well maybe not every minute, like when the dog throws up on your carpet just as the doorbell rings with the General arriving for dinner, or a child falls out of the tree and breaks his arm minutes before you are due at a reception in your honor, or the movers lose all the trousers to your husbands uniforms etc. etc.) and wouldn't trade with the wife of any other profession."

Mrs. Moore was a graduate of Chevy Chase Junior College, Chevy Chase, Maryland and attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as a member of the Pi Phi Sorority, prior to her marriage. Wherever her husband was stationed, Mrs. Moore became an integral part of the community, serving as a Brownie and Girl Scout Leader, Cub Scout Den Mother and Red Cross volunteer in the Army hospitals. She supported the day care centers and worked with the wives clubs to take better care of the enlisted soldier and his family. Mrs. Moore was especially active in setting up the Army Community Service organizations that are now a permanent fixture on all Army posts and which assist each soldier as they process into their new duty stations.

Mrs. Moore is survived by her husband of 55 years, Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Harold G. Moore, and their five children: Greg Moore of Dallas, Texas; Lt. Col. (Ret.) Steve Moore of Richmond, Virginia; Julie Moore XXXXXXX of Granbury, Texas; Cecile Moore Rainey of Denver, Colorado; and Lt. Col. David Moore of Ft. Monmouth, New Jersey. She has twelve grandchildren. Mrs. Moore maintained homes in Mt. Crested Butte, Colorado and Auburn, Alabama.

Mrs. Moore will be buried at the Post Cemetery in Ft. Benning, Georgia, alongside the men of the 7th Cavalry whose funerals she attended in 1965 and 1966, and whose families she sustained through their sudden and terrible loss.

Funeral Services will be held at St. Michael's Catholic Church in Auburn, Alabama at 9:30AM (CST) on Thursday, April 22nd. Visitation will be at the Jeffcoat-Trant Funeral Home in Opelika, Alabama from 5:00PM - 7:00PM on April 21st. In lieu of flowers, donations should be sent to the Ia Drang Scholarship Fund, 302 N. Main Street, Copperas Cove, Texas 76522.

Jeffcoat-Trant Funeral Home is directing.

http://www.oanow.com/servlet/Satelli...th=!obituaries





We Were Soldiers
By David Levine
04/04/2007 11:34:09 PM
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Gwyneth Paltrow
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MPAA rating R
Starring Mel Gibson, Madeleine Stowe, Greg Kinnear, Sam Elliott, Chris Klein, Keri Russell, Barry Pepper,
Director Randall Wallace
Producer Stephen McEveety, Bruce Davey, Randall Wallace
Screen Writer Randall Wallace
Our Rating 3.0 out of 5

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Post September 11 cinema has seen its share of war movies designed to evoke and sustain a sense of American patriotism. In the last few months, we've re-visited the war in Kosovo (Behind Enemy Lines), the war in Somalia (Black Hawk Down), and most recently, World War II (Hart's War). We Were Soldiers is the latest in the onslaught, a story based on the true accounts of the first bloody battle of the Vietnam War. With so many war films recently released, We Were Soldiers has a difficult task as ittries to ride the patriotism express.

We Were Soldiers is based on the book We Were Soldiers Once€And Young written by Lieutenant Colonel Harold Moore and Joseph L. Galloway, the only journalist willing to go into the front lines to capture a first hand account of the war. In the film, Mel Gibson plays Harold Moore, a down-to-earth officer who is responsible for leading a group of innocent, naive young men into the area of Vietnam known as €œThe Valley of Death.€ But not soon after Lt. Col. Moore and his troops touch down, their position is compromised and they find themselves outnumbered almost 5 to 1. The American soldiers engage in a deadly battle for control of the area.

We Were Soldiers takes a different approach to the war story theme by addressing the emotional toll the war has on the soldiers and the families they left behind. The first third of the movie moves very slowly as it attempts to establish the relationships between the husbands and their families, and the military brass and their men. We learn that Moore is a family man who prides himself as much on his wife, Julie (Madeleine Stowe), and their five young children, as he does on his military career and his troops. Moore congratulates Lt. Jack Geoghegan (Chris Klein) and his wife Barbara (Keri Russell) on the birth of their first child as the two pray together before heading into battle.

While at war, we're introduced to journalist Joe Galloway (Barry Pepper). Despite the strong military background of his family, Galloway wants to capture the war through images and writings so that people back in America can understand what happens on the front lines. During the height of the battle, Command Sergeant Major Basil Plumley (Sam Elliott) instructs Galloway to trade his camera for a gun. Though Galloway takes to battle like the others and even carries a soldier's charred body to a rescue chopper, he eventually throws his gun down and returns to taking pictures.

The telling of the human aspect of the war is not limited to the events that unfold in the American camp. We are also given interesting views into the strategy used by the Vietnamese during battle, as well as their sorrow when they pick up their fallen comrades. But the focus of the film is clearly on Moore and Galloway, the only two characters that have any degree of depth€”all others are drawn extremely thin. Sgt. Maj. Plumley's sole purpose is to provide some scenes of comic relief between the orders he barks at the troops; Lt. Geogheganis given one key scene in the beginning, but later he is only seen once before he ends up as a casualty of war.

Back at home, the only screen time given to tell the war's impact on the wives and families is when they receive the tragic news that their husbands and fathers have died in battle. We never see their struggle to raise their families alone, or the immediacy to scrape up whatever information they could on the war and the status of their loved ones. We never see the trouble Julie has inaddressing the concerns her young children have for their father being at war, or the difficulty Barbara has being a young mother with a newborn child.

Despite its best intentions, We Were Soldiers is just another in a long line of graphic war movies depicted in realistic detail. The cinematography is very striking and has a journalistic feel, as if we are on the front lines looking in on the action as told through the lens of Galloway's camera. As soldiers are shot and wounded, their blood splatters on the lens (and thus, the movie screen). Many of the battle scenes are shown in slow motion, using quick edits that are choreographed to moving scores and songs meant to evoke emotion. We really feel like we're with those troops as they push through the Valley of Death.

The humanistic approach behind We Were Soldiers is well intended, but the concept is not fully realized in the short amount of time devoted to the movie. If the battle sequences had been shortened and the film's opening scenes tightened up, it's possible this theme could have worked to the film's advantage and provided the right sentiment to sustain our current sense of patriotism. Though certainly not a bad film, it fails to give us the complete picture of how the battle impacted the key players and sadly, We Were Soldiers will be remembered more for the gritty war scenes than the emotional toll on those it meant to show.

The DVD features commentary from Wallace, 10 deleted scenes, and an interview with Madeleine Stowe's wig. The only one of those I really cared to see, unfortunately, doesn't really exist.

Copyright FilmCritic.com: We Were Soldiers
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Last edited by DiMarie; 08-05-2007 at 10:06 PM. Reason: edited for some located information on the family
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Old 08-05-2007, 09:08 AM #7
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Thanks for the information. It lists her brother as living at Fort Monmouth, NJ which is 2 minutes from my house. Linda
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"Thanks for this!" says:
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Old 08-05-2007, 10:21 AM #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LinJane View Post
[B]Lisa LI am so happy to hear you had a good outcome. And great about your daughter. I have a cousin from Korea who is a beautiful, wonderful woman. My poor mother-in-law spent a long time not hearing from one of her sons. She kept calling the Dept of Marines and no information was provided. One day, she had a knock at her door. It was a Marine. She was horrified, only to find out they wanted to tell her, "in person" that her son was ok and had been unable to communicate due to his orders. Not a knock anyone wants. But at least hers was a good one.
him to.!! Ha Ha. just joking. Linda
Thanks Lin, Yes, we have been blessed in so many ways. Too many to count. That was scary to say the least about the knock on the door via Military personnel. I probably would of fainted.
Have a nice week-end.
Lisa
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Old 02-23-2017, 04:48 PM #9
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Frown Saddened to report passing of Hal

Our member from long Past, Julie from Texas's Father, who Mel Gebson portrayed in the movie We Were Soldiers Once, has passed away.

Julie I am so sorry to hear of your loss. It was great fun reading the stories you shared of Mel's time with your Dad and family.
My sincere sympathy,
Dianne
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