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Old 08-10-2007, 05:29 PM   #11
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PubMed Abstract

J Intellect Disabil Res. 2007 Aug;51(Pt 8):620-4.
An individual with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and Smith-Magenis microdeletion syndrome: is chromosome 17p11.2 a candidate region for Tourette syndrome putative susceptibility genes?

Shelley BP, Robertson MM, Turk J.
Quote:
This is the first published case description in the current literature of the association of definite Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and the Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), both confirmed by DSM-IV-TR criteria and molecular cytogenetic analysis, respectively. The co-occurrence of GTS, SMS and their common behavioural/neuropsychiatric abnormalities should warrant further genetic investigation of chromosome 17p11.2 deletion site as it may be a promising region for containing a gene(s) of aetiological importance in the development of the GTS phenotype. Alternatively, the co-occurrence may be due to the common endophenotypic mechanisms shared by these disorders, rather than being specific for GTS that could be explored using strategies of quantitative trait loci - endophenotype-based approach. Research into this genomic region may also benefit psychiatric genetic research in enhancing understanding of the biological and molecular underpinnings of common behavioural problems that are seen in both GTS and SMS. This would lead to advancement in neurobehavioural/neuropsychiatric genetics which will help in further explaining the broader perspective of gene-brain-behaviour interrelationships.

PMID: 17598875 [PubMed - in process]
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Old 08-10-2007, 05:36 PM   #12
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Default GABAergic circuits

PubMed Abstract

Clin Genet. 2007 Jul;72(1):1-8.
Development of cortical GABAergic circuits and its implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.
Di Cristo G.

Quote:
GABAergic interneurons powerfully control the function of cortical networks. In addition, they strongly regulate cortical development by modulating several cellular processes such as neuronal proliferation, migration, differentiation and connectivity. Not surprisingly, aberrant development of GABAergic circuits has been implicated in many neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism and Tourette's syndrome. Unfortunately, efforts directed towards the comprehension of the mechanisms regulating GABAergic circuits formation and function have been impaired by the strikingly heterogeneity, both at the morphological and functional level, of GABAergic interneurons. Recent technical advances, including the improvement of interneurons-specific labelling techniques, have started to reveal the basic principles underlying this process. This review summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms underlying the construction of GABAergic circuits in the cortex, with a particular focus on potential implications for brain diseases with neurodevelopmental origin.

PMID: 17594392 [PubMed - in process]
Full text article is available at cost from here. I just posted this one because I thought some people might be interested.
Full Text available
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Old 08-10-2007, 05:43 PM   #13
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Default Development of distinct control networks through segregation and integration

PubMed Abstract

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Aug 6; [Epub ahead of print]
Development of distinct control networks through segregation and integration.
Fair DA, Dosenbach NU, Church JA, Cohen AL, Brahmbhatt S, Miezin FM, Barch DM, Raichle ME, Petersen SE, Schlaggar BL.

Quote:
Human attentional control is unrivaled. We recently proposed that adults depend on distinct frontoparietal and cinguloopercular networks for adaptive online task control versus more stable set control, respectively. During development, both experience-dependent evoked activity and spontaneous waves of synchronized cortical activity are thought to support the formation and maintenance of neural networks. Such mechanisms may encourage tighter "integration" of some regions into networks over time while "segregating" other sets of regions into separate networks. Here we use resting state functional connectivity MRI, which measures correlations in spontaneous blood oxygenation level-dependent signal fluctuations between brain regions to compare previously identified control networks between children and adults. We find that development of the proposed adult control networks involves both segregation (i.e., decreased short-range connections) and integration (i.e., increased long-range connections) of the brain regions that comprise them. Delay/disruption in the developmental processes of segregation and integration may play a role in disorders of control, such as autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Tourette's syndrome.

PMID: 17679691 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Full Text article should be available here and also at PubMed Central, although I can't get it working at present myself.
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/reprint/0705843104v1
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Old 08-10-2007, 07:32 PM   #14
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Default Olanzapine (Zyprexa)

Olanzapine (Zyprexa)

PubMed Abstract

Psychiatr Prax. 2007 Jul;34(5):253-4.
[Gilles-de-la-Tourette Syndrome as a Tardive Dyskinesia.]
[Article in German]

Kozian R, Friederich M.
Asklepios-Fachklinik Stadtroda.

Quote:
Following ten years of continuous olanzapine therapy a 51 years old man developed a Gilles de la Tourette syndrome which disappeared after changing to amisulprid. The Tourette-syndrome will be attributed to a tardive dyskinesia induced by olanzapine.

PMID: 17597439 [PubMed - in process]
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Old 08-16-2007, 04:57 PM   #15
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Default Deep Brain Stimulation and TS - TSA-USA

Medical News Today article...
Neurology / Neuroscience News
Article Date: 07 Aug 2007
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/78872.php
Deep Brain Stimulation And Tourette Syndrome

Quote:
Still considered experimental, the procedure used-Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS)-involves the implantation of electrodes in the brain that are stimulated by a surgically implanted pulse generator in the upper chest. Several studies have shown that this surgical intervention may aid in the amelioration of involuntary movements in patients with Parkinson's Disease and Essential Tremor. More recent studies have shown promise for other disorders including Dystonia.
Quote:
Early experience with DBS for tics in TS has been mixed. While some individuals have experienced a reduction in symptoms, others have not. There is no long-term follow-up yet to indicate whether or not symptoms will return at some point. It should be understood that when undergoing this procedure, there might be serious risks involved that could include cerebral bleeding and infection.
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Only rigorous, methodologically sound scientific study of DBS will provide the answers we seek.
____________________________

TSA-USA Statement: Deep Brain Stimulation and Tourette Syndrome
Following is a statement from TSA Medical and Scientific Advisors.

http://www.tsa-usa.org/news/DBSStatement.htm
(I notice this Statement has been updated 8/2007)
____________________________

PubMed Abstract
Mov Disord. 2006 Nov;21(11):1831-8.
Patient selection and assessment recommendations for deep brain stimulation in Tourette syndrome.
Mink JW, Walkup J, Frey KA, Como P, Cath D, Delong MR, Erenberg G, Jankovic J, Juncos J, Leckman JF, Swerdlow N, Visser-Vandewalle V, Vitek JL; Tourette Syndrome Association, Inc.

Department of Neurology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA.

Quote:
In response to recent publicity regarding the potential use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for reducing tic severity in Tourette's syndrome (TS), the Tourette Syndrome Association convened a group of TS and DBS experts to develop recommendations to guide the early use and potential clinical trials of DBS for TS and other tic disorders. The goals of these recommendations are to ensure that all surgical candidates are (1) fully informed about the risks, benefits, and alternative treatments available; (2) receive a comprehensive evaluation before surgery to ensure that DBS is clearly the appropriate clinical treatment choice; and (3) that early clinical experience will be documented publicly to facilitate rational decision-making for both clinical care and future clinical trials.

PMID: 16991144 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Last edited by Lara; 08-16-2007 at 05:40 PM.
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Old 08-16-2007, 05:54 PM   #16
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Default Validity of large-deformation high dimensional brain mapping of the basal ganglia

PubMed Abstract
Psychiatry Res. 2007 Feb 28;154(2):181-90. Epub 2007 Feb 7.

Validity of large-deformation high dimensional brain mapping of the basal ganglia in adults with Tourette syndrome.
Wang L, Lee DY, Bailey E, Hartlein JM, Gado MH, Miller MI, Black KJ.

Quote:
The basal ganglia and thalamus may play a critical role for behavioral inhibition mediated by prefrontal, parietal, temporal, and cingulate cortices. The cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop with projections from frontal cortex to striatum, then to globus pallidus or to substantia nigra pars reticulata, to thalamus and back to cortex, provides the anatomical substrate for this function. In-vivo neuroimaging studies have reported reduced volumes in the thalamus and basal ganglia in individuals with Tourette Syndrome (TS) when compared with healthy controls. However, patterns of neuroanatomical shape that may be associated with these volume differences have not yet been consistently characterized. Tools are being developed at a rapid pace within the emerging field of computational anatomy that allow for the precise analysis of neuroanatomical shape derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images, and give us the ability to characterize subtle abnormalities of brain structures that were previously undetectable. In this study, T1-weighted MR scans were collected in 15 neuroleptic-naοve adults with TS or chronic motor tics and 15 healthy, tic-free adult subjects matched for age, gender and handedness. We demonstrated the validity and reliability of large-deformation high dimensional brain mapping (HDBM-LD) as a tool to characterize the basal ganglia (caudate, globus pallidus and putamen) and thalamus. We found no significant volume or shape differences in any of the structures in this small sample of subjects.
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Old 08-16-2007, 05:58 PM   #17
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Default Time trends in reported diagnoses of childhood neuropsychiatric disorders:

PubMed Abstract
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Feb;161(2):193-8.
Time trends in reported diagnoses of childhood neuropsychiatric disorders: a Danish cohort study.
Atladottir HO, Parner ET, Schendel D, Dalsgaard S, Thomsen PH, Thorsen P.

North Atlantic Neuro-Epidemiology Alliances at Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.

Quote:
OBJECTIVES: To examine trends in autism (autism spectrum disorder and childhood autism) in the context of 3 additional childhood neuropsychiatric disorders: hyperkinetic disorder, Tourette syndrome, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

DESIGN: Population-based cohort study.

SETTING: Children were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry. Relevant outcomes were obtained via linkage with the Danish National Psychiatric Register, which included reported diagnoses through 2004 by psychiatrists using diagnostic criteria from the International Statistical Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision.

PARTICIPANTS: All children born in Denmark from 1990 through 1999, a total of 669 995 children.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cumulative incidence proportion by age, stratified by year of birth, for each disorder.

RESULTS: Statistically significant increases were found in cumulative incidence across specific birth years for autism spectrum disorder, childhood autism, hyperkinetic disorder, and Tourette syndrome. No significant change in cumulative incidence was observed for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

CONCLUSIONS: Recent increases in reported autism diagnoses might not be unique among childhood neuropsychiatric disorders and might be part of a more widespread epidemiologic phenomenon. The reasons for the observed common pattern of change in reported cumulative incidence could not be determined in this study, but the data underscore the growing awareness of and demand for services for children with neurodevelopmental disorders in general
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Old 08-16-2007, 06:03 PM   #18
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Default Tic symptom profiles from two genetically isolated populations

PubMed Abstract
Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Feb 1;61(3):292-300. Epub 2006 Apr 11.
Tic symptom profiles in subjects with Tourette Syndrome from two genetically isolated populations.
Mathews CA, Jang KL, Herrera LD, Lowe TL, Budman CL, Erenberg G, Naarden A, Bruun RD, Schork NJ, Freimer NB, Reus VI.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0810, USA.

Quote:
BACKGROUND: Tourette Syndrome (TS) has a complex etiology and wide variability in phenotypic expression. Identifying underlying symptom patterns may be useful for etiological and outcome studies of TS.

METHODS: Lifetime tic and related symptom data were collected between 1996 and 2001 in 121 TS subjects from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and 133 TS subjects from the Ashkenazi Jewish (AS) population in the US. Subjects were grouped by tic symptoms using an agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis. Cluster membership was tested for association with available ancillary information (age of onset, tic severity, comorbid disorders, medication treatment and family history).

RESULTS: Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups in each sample, those with predominantly simple tics (cluster 1), and those with multiple complex tics (cluster 2). Membership in cluster 2 was correlated with increased tic severity, global impairment, medication treatment, and presence of comorbid obsessive-compulsive symptoms in both samples, and with family history of tics, lower verbal IQ, earlier age of onset, and comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the AS sample.

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence for consistent and reproducible symptom profiles in two independent TS study samples. These findings have implications for etiological studies of TS
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Old 08-16-2007, 06:04 PM   #19
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I am going to digest this one slowly Lara! thank you for posting that...lots to chew on huh
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Old 08-16-2007, 06:14 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Chemar View Post
I am going to digest this one slowly Lara! thank you for posting that...lots to chew on huh

Hi! I'm thinking you mean the "time trends" one from Denmark? I'm running out of time right now, but was looking for the full text articles from that one and also the genetic population differences one. Will post them here shortly. The one from Denmark is very interesting. Look forward to reading more about that.
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