Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Concussion Syndrome For traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post concussion syndrome (PCS).


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Old 01-09-2020, 03:27 AM #1
Michael4 Michael4 is offline
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Default Concussion Vulnerability Linked to Hormones

A recent 2019 study found that women during their late luteal phase, where neuroprotective hormones start to decline, were more likely to sustain a concussion. I firmly believe this head sensitivity everyone is having is due to a under-repaired previous concussion, caused by a hormone deficiency.
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Old 01-09-2020, 01:30 PM #2
Mark in Idaho Mark in Idaho is offline
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This hormone issue has been studied for over a decade. Yes, there are periods when some WOMEN are more sensitive to the effects of a concussion.

A researcher in Atlanta tried to develop a patented protocol using venture capital to get a progesterone based early intervention therapy approved for sale. After a few years of clinical testing, the protocol was found to be ineffective.

Some women can benefit from a neuro-endocrine assessment. NT has had a few women benefit from hormone rebalancing. Not much has helped men.


Watch the Concussion vs Whiplash YouTube.

Also, if you notice the posts by people with sensitivity to head movement and contacts, their writing exhibits a thought process of over-analyzing all of the events of each day in an anxious or fearful way. The science shows that people who over-analyze the little things in life will have longer and more problematic recoveries.These people also tend to live busy lives. These busy lives are often a form of self medicating. "If I am constantly attentive too all of these things, I will feel better about my life." This 'over-attending" to life can be a challenge to people who suffered a concussion.

This over-attending keeps cortisol levels high, effecting other hormones and neurotransmitters.
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Old 01-09-2020, 02:15 PM #3
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Firstly, all these claims are pure conjecture. You cannot certainly say that these new head incidents are not new concussions. I believe that completely not considering the possibility that the head sensitivity is real and not psychosomatic is irresponsible and could result in much suffering.

It would be most likely 100% psychosomatic if patients had a history of just one concussion, but everyone reporting this problem seems to have the exact same story. A male with 4-5 concussions starts to spiral downwards, getting more and more susceptible to new concussions. The process is gradual, each new incident taking away more vulnerability, which contrasts a classic psychosomatic story.

Considering that 40% of DOCTORS' diagnoses are predicted to be wrong, and our current knowledge and imaging technology regarding the brain is poor, it is bold to assume that multiple head injuries cannot result in vulnerability to new ones. Didn't the NFL doctors believe CTE was psychosomatic until science caught up?

I am not sure if my hypopituitarism is involved with the sensitivity, but the fact that the PCS symptoms and head sensitivity shared the exact same onset gives me hope. I had ~ 5 concussions prior without head sensitivity and without PCS symptoms, but a very minor one set off the whole problem.
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Old 01-09-2020, 10:50 PM #4
Mark in Idaho Mark in Idaho is offline
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Did I miss something? What claims?

There are at least 4 reasons people experience a return of concussion symptoms.

1. Another impact causing another concussion

2. An impact causing a whiplash trauma

3. A PTSD or anxiety driven flashback that causes the mind to replay concussions symptoms, both physiological and emotional/psychological
Many in this group have a history of anxiety or depression or OCD or perfectionism or need to be in control.

4. An event that is over-stimulating, loud noises, too many voices, visual over-stimulation, a job task that is fatiguing with these excessive stimulations, and any of a myriad of these stimulations.

Some may have other underlying conditions with hormones or blood sugar or high blood pressure, etc.

Some may have done some innocuous activity that they would never expect to be a trigger. A late night or a bad night's sleep. Having a few drinks and getting a buzz. Even a lot of exciting and happy activities can be taxing on a compromised brain.

Try to pay attention to what your body, mind and brain is telling you. Learning to moderate your daily life to limit triggers is important.
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