Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Concussion Syndrome For traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post concussion syndrome (PCS).


advertisement
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-11-2022, 05:01 PM #1
Michael4 Michael4 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 17
2 yr Member
Michael4 Michael4 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 17
2 yr Member
Default Trauma Triggered Migraine as Explanation for Bumps Causing Neurological Symptoms

After reading BurritoWarrior's post, I began looking into head jolts causing migraines. I was initially very skeptical, believing these events were mini-concussions, but I was quickly convinced as I read literature reviews. The most important paper on the subject I have come across is titled "Trauma-triggered migraine: an explanation for common neurological attacks after mild head injury." This paper begins by listing studies, dating as far back to 1898, where doctors observed patients experiencing neurological symptoms after mild head trauma. The paper discusses laboratory findings, such as how "All EEG recordings made during TTM attacks have been abnormal...." The article firmly states, "That head trauma itself rather than its emotional concomitants elicits TTM attacks is undoubted, for these phenomena do not follow trauma to other parts of the body." The article summarizes, “Minor head trauma sometimes triggers complex temporary disturbances of brain function that are often alarming and can last from hours to days. Occurring particularly in children and adolescents, these attacks contrast sharply with the brief dazed states that typically follow minor head trauma. For two decades now, these attacks have been identified as "migraines" in a number of studies. Yet this identification is not well known to physicians and surgeons who care for head-injured patients and is sometimes not even mentioned in current discussions of these attacks.”

Furthermore, another article titled "Traumatic Migraine Versus Concussion" states, "There are no symptoms that differentiate trauma-triggered migraines from concussions...."

It was quite reassuring to learn that the ability for minor head impacts to cause concussion-like symptoms was accepted in the literature, with hard evidence such as EEG findings backing it up. My neurologist accepted my research and plans to treat the disorder with the traditional migraine protocol.

It is important to note that the first literature review I cited states that prophylactic medication can only treat the headache itself and not the cognitive symptoms, so it would seem wise to avoid head trauma to a reasonable extent.

I am looking into botox treatment as other prophylactic medications such as Topiramate don't seem to be well-tolerated, and the side effects of botox are very minor.

I would like to add that I find tea helps attenuate the TTM attacks, presumably as caffeine is known to reduce migraine symptoms. In one of my previous posts, claiming testosterone therapy "cured me," I overstated the benefit this therapy conferred to me. I noticed that the symptoms greatly reduced, so I prematurely concluded I would eventually be completely cured. Unfortunately the testosterone-blunting effect plateaued. But, the headache blocking effect was significant and exists. The article "Testosterone levels in men with chronic migraine states," "These studies demonstrate that testosterone effectively treats migraine headaches in both men and women and that low testosterone is likely causal and not the result of migraines."

I have also looked into ADHD to explain my cognitive symptoms, separate from a TTM attack. I scored highly on the ADHD diagnosis test, and received an ADHD diagnosis from my psychiatrist. I am unsure if I truly have ADHD, possibly worsened by concussions, or if the cognitive symptoms are from PCS, but regardless, the ADHD medication methylphenidate has been shown to ameliorate PCS symptoms in "Long-term treatment with methylphenidate for fatigue after traumatic brain injury," which my primary care doctor also corroborated. The methylphenidate has been tremendously helpful for almost all of the symptoms I have experienced. From my research, methylphenidate seems to have a very good side effect profile, and most of the stigma against the medication is unwarranted. I have not experienced any side effects except for appetite suppression.

But, there exists evidence that tolerance to ADHD medications builds, despite what anecdotes online say, so it is advisable to take drug holidays. My psychiatrist also recommends drug holidays.

Finally, I have noticed I have a sensitivity to smell called osmophobia, which is very prevalent in migraine populations. Whenever I smell odors such as cooking fumes, motor vehicle exhaust, or cigarette smoke, I get dizzy and experience cognitive symptoms. I was wondering if anyone else experiences this.
Michael4 is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote

advertisement
Old 05-13-2022, 12:35 AM #2
Mark in Idaho Mark in Idaho is offline
Legendary
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Somewhere near here
Posts: 11,262
10 yr Member
Mark in Idaho Mark in Idaho is offline
Legendary
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Somewhere near here
Posts: 11,262
My Mood: Trauma Triggered Migraine as Explanation for Bumps Causing Neurological Symptoms
10 yr Member
Default

You must be avoiding the methyphenidate reports that look at the negative value. The last time I looked, there were more saying ADHD meds value is short term and fraught with negatives for the neurologically stressed.

Are you looking for a drug regimen to use at a maintenance level?
__________________
Mark in Idaho

"Be still and know that I am God" Psalm 46:10
Mark in Idaho is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote
Old 05-15-2022, 02:56 PM #3
DrewDigital DrewDigital is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 70
5 yr Member
DrewDigital DrewDigital is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 70
5 yr Member
Default

If you look at the most severe PCS cases, two factors are usually involved - pharmaceutical drugs such as antidepressants, pain meds, or migraine cocktails, and multiple head hits.

I would advise against the migraine protocol because they usually involve those medications.

You mentioned - "It is important to note that the first literature review I cited states that prophylactic medication can only treat the headache itself and not the cognitive symptoms, so it would seem wise to avoid head trauma to a reasonable extent."

A good way to avoid the minor head bumps is to wear a padded hat to protect the brain while it is recovering. The Ribcap is a good one:
Protective Special Needs Helmets for Adults & Children | Ribcap
__________________

.


.
(Too Many Head Bumps)

Last edited by DrewDigital; 05-15-2022 at 04:12 PM.
DrewDigital is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote
Reply

Tags
attacks, head, migraine, symptoms, trauma

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Minor bumps or jolts causing issues for you? Jomar Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Concussion Syndrome 11 01-07-2020 02:10 PM
Bone Spurs causing neurological problems? Comeonthen Spinal Disorders & Back Pain 3 09-30-2016 07:23 AM
An explanation of sensitivity to bumps Mark in Idaho Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Concussion Syndrome 6 09-12-2016 08:18 PM
Anxiety causing neurological symptoms Idiopathic PN Peripheral Neuropathy 6 12-24-2012 01:42 AM
B12 symptoms triggered by stress? magenta272 Vitamins, Nutrients, Herbs and Supplements 4 07-14-2009 12:22 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:53 AM.

Powered by vBulletin • Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise v2.7.1 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2022 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
 

NeuroTalk Forums

Helping support those with neurological and related conditions.

 

The material on this site is for informational purposes only,
and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment
provided by a qualified health care provider.


Always consult your doctor before trying anything you read here.