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Old 10-06-2006, 01:56 PM   #11
Sydney
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Default magnesium lactate questions, etc.

Wow! I have read all of these links on magnesium. Quite overwhelming. I have severe
FM and RSD. I ordered the mag. cream from Kirkland suggested by Mrs. D/ Mrs. D you also recommended ,mag lactate over citrate. Idid some additional research on the citrate. Looks like it is for constipaton? Also I read somewhere that it shouldn't be taken with calcium. I took a closer look at my oral supplement and see that I am taking calcium citrate(600mg) and Magnesium citrate 300 mg. also included is400 IU D. I have had chronic diarreha for weeks as I have been double dosing it daily.
Most of the labels don't say what kind of mag. it is. I called Life Extensions (good co.). Their product is citrate. Any suggestions for findng the mag. lactate ? Also, I take myo mag from Health Product distributors. It has numerous B vitamins (minimal amts.) 5 mg maganese and 440 L malic acid(from Mg malate and malic acid.
Any thoughts as to sources and quantities of good magnesium for severe FM
Sydney
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Old 10-07-2006, 11:22 AM   #12
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Lightbulb Hi Sydney...

Magnesium citrate is a laxative..but there is a threshold, for each person according to dose. Some people can tolerate it in lower doses, but others
can't.

Calcium in the citrate form, as well as the mag citrate, are favored for people with a history of calcium oxalate kidney stones (about 80% of stones are this type).

The citrate form is used to deliver calcium for these patients.

This is one place to find the magnesium lactate:
http://www.medshopexpress.com/081989.html
Magnesium lactate (MgL) is “Mag-Tab SR” : 84 mg (7 mEq) elemental magnesium. The salt MgL contains 12% Mg.

You can find SlowMag and its generics locally. There is practically no diarrhea risk with them. The generics are MagDelay and Mag64... I buy mine at WalMart--the pharmacist orders them for me, behind the counter. 60 are only about $6.00. Affordable and effective. Two per day is enough.

You don't have to buy the most expensive just because lactate showed up well in studies. The Magnesium Chloride in SlowMag works just as well.
And BTW...SlowMag (brand name) was formulated originally by the Searle company for use by doctors to treat magnesium deficiency. The patent is now owned by Purdue. It has been around a long time, as over the counter.

You can buy magnesium malate at Puritan's Pride:
http://www.puritan.com/pages/file.as...CPID=1280&np=1
This is one I use sometimes, and my son all the time. But sometimes it gives my diarrhea, so I prefer the SlowMag.
However, the malic acid in this, is recommended for fibro patients.


So if you want to get more for your $$...you might try the Puritan product...
They have sales all the time, and are very quick and dependable. Their mailing fees remain the same low price
regardless of how much you order...I get alot of my standard yearly vits at their buy one get 2 free sales.
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Last edited by mrsD; 03-15-2012 at 09:22 AM. Reason: removing expired link
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Old 10-07-2006, 11:39 AM   #13
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Lightbulb Hi Lara...

If I recall correctly, BonnieG used the taurate, because she found taurine
helpful for TS.
Certainly since the mag taurate is not common and hard to find, you
can supplement them separately...
Taurine itself is very inexpensive, but I don't know its availability in Australia.
I know in Canada some amino acids are restricted.

I don't think, there is much mag in each tablet of magnesium taurate.
Labeling for this product is confusing... I don't think it is 125mg of
magnesium...as that would be a huge capsule. I don't recall the size being that large. Elemental values for taurate are about 9% mag.
http://www.amazon.com/Cardiovascular.../dp/B00014D5TS

All of the chelates give better absorption than the old oxide. The taurate was originally formulated for cardiovascular issues (arrythmias).
http://www.drhoffman.com/page.cfm/519

Certainly you can use them separately if you cannot find this product.
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Old 10-09-2006, 04:21 PM   #14
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Thanks for your response, mrsd.
Yes, the Taurine is very expensive. Used not be able to find it here, but I've not looked in a couple of years. It's possibly available now. I used to buy a really good powder from an osteopath for my RLS. It was calcium/magnesium and some other things. It didn't have the taurine as the mag. but it was chelated magnesium. I just forget which one it was right now.

Anyway, thanks for the info.
Appreciated.
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Old 10-09-2006, 05:29 PM   #15
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Hi Lara
we have never used the mag taurate as my son has been on the calcium/magnesium/zinc with separate taurine for years (in mg of each 1000/500/50 plus 500 each evening)

I do know that when we stop giving the taurine, he feels the difference with more frequent tics.

As MrsD said.......here taurine is relatively inexpensive and readily available

http://www.iherb.com may have reasonable shipping rates to Australia as they seem reasonable on all other things too...dont know if you are allowed to ship it into the country tho
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Old 10-10-2006, 05:11 PM   #16
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Lightbulb next....

I am going to post some papers on specific conditions and Magnesium
that I have found/been sent/ or stumbled onto. Some are from my old Mag
thread from OBT...

This one was sent to me this summer by Cara (jccglutenfree here).
Quote:
Magnes Res. 2006 Mar;19(1):46-52.Click here to read Links
Improvement of neurobehavioral disorders in children supplemented with magnesium-vitamin B6. I. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorders.

* Mousain-Bosc M,
* Roche M,
* Polge A,
* Pradal-Prat D,
* Rapin J,
* Bali JP.

Explorations Fonctionnelles du Systeme Nerveux, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Caremeau, Nimes, France.

Some previous studies have reported the involvement of magnesium (Mg) deficiency in children with ADHD syndrome. In this work, 40 children with clinical symptoms of ADHD were followed clinically and biologically during a magnesium-vitamin B6 (Mg-B6) regimen (6 mg/kg/d Mg, 0.6 mg/kg/d vit-B6) which was set up for at least 8 weeks. Symptoms of ADHD (hyperactivity, hyperemotivity/ aggressiveness, lack of attention at school) were scored (0-4) at different times; in parallel, intraerythrocyte Mg2+ (Erc-Mg) and blood ionized Ca2+ (i-Ca) were measured. Children from the ADHD group showed significantly lower Erc-Mg values than control children (n = 36). In almost all cases of ADHD, Mg-B6 regimen for at least two months significantly modified the clinical symptoms of the disease: namely, hyperactivity and hyperemotivity/aggressiveness were reduced, school attention was improved. In parallel, the Mg-B6 regimen led to a significant increase in Erc-Mg values. When the Mg-B6 treatment was stopped, clinical symptoms of the disease reappeared in few weeks together with a decrease in Erc-Mg values. This study brings additional information about the therapeutic role of a Mg-B6 regimen in children with ADHD symptoms.

PMID: 16846100 [PubMed - in process]
and another for ADHD:
Quote:
Ann Acad Med Stetin. 1998; 44: 297-314. Related Articles, Links
[The effect of deficiency of selected bioelements on hyperactivity in children with certain specified mental disorders]
[Article in Polish]
Starobrat-Hermelin B.
Oddzialu Psychiatrii Dzieci, Dzieckiem i Mlodzieza w Szczecinie.
The aim of my work was the answer to the following questions: how often does the deficiency of magnesium, copper, zinc, calcium, iron occur among hyperactive children in comparison with healthy children, deficiency of which of the considered bioelements is the most frequent, what is the effect of supplementation of deficit element on hyperactivity and does it depend on other certain disorders that coexist with hyperactivity? In a process of establishing the subject diagnosis I have followed the DSM IV criteria recognizing ADHD among examined ones. I have determined the deficiency of magnesium, copper, zinc, calcium, iron in the group of 116 children with diagnosed ADHD. Consequently, as a result, I have found out that shortage of above-mentioned bioelements occurs more often among hyperactive children than among those being healthy, and deficiency of magnesium is the most frequent in this respect. Further, I have divided the group of 110 children with magnesium deficiency into two groups according to the other mental disorders that coexist with ADHD: 1) the group where hyperactivity coexists with disorders typical for developmental age such as enuresis, tics, separation anxiety, stuttering, selective mutism (63 children); 2) the group where hyperactivity coexists with disruptive behaviour disorders: conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder (47 children). The content of magnesium, copper, zinc, calcium, iron has been determined respectively in blood (serum and red cells) and in hair by atomic absorption spectroscopy method in both groups accordingly. At the same time, the hyperactivity tests were carried out using Conner's Rating Scales for Parents and Teachers, Wender's Scale as well as Quotient of Development to Freedom from Distractibility. During the statistical analysis the inparametric tests have been used taking as a significance level p < 0.05. On the ground of obtained findings I have not stated any significant differences in bioelements content among hyperactive children in relation to other coexisting disorders, except for zinc. The zinc content in hair was higher among children with ADHD and disruptive behaviour disorder. The assessment of hyperactivity indicated the remarkably higher coefficient among children with coexisting behaviour disorders as compared to hyperactive children among whom, additionally, disorders typical for developmental age have occurred. The analysis of influence exerted by magnesium supplementation on hyperactivity has been carried out in the group of total 75 children with ADHD jointly with magnesium deficiency. The group of 50 children actually tested, apart from standard treatment have received the specified doses of magnesium preparations for 6 months on regular basis. The group of 25 children was left with standard treatment without additional magnesium. In both above-mentioned groups the content of bioelements and respectively ADHD level have been determined just before and after the test. The obtained results have clearly disclosed significant increase of magnesium, zinc, calcium content (Tab. 1) and respectively essential decrease of hyperactivity in the group of children treated with magnesium. At the same time, however, among the children given standard treatment without magnesium, hyperactivity has intensified (Tab. 3, 4). The findings herein presented indicate that it is necessary to take into consideration a possible bioelements deficiency among children with ADHD. Consequently, the accomplished study proves that there is a need of magnesium supplementation in ADHD children irrespectively of other mental disorders. The supplementation of that kind of magnesium supplementation together with standard traditional mode of treatment gives us the opportunity to extend the methods of therapy of ADHD children who are the "children of the risk" in connection with their educational, emotional and social problems.
PMID: 9857546 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
more for ADHD:
Quote:
(B) Does the child of stomach aches, headaches or muscle pains, or is sleep difficult and restless? These symptoms often indicate a deficiency of magnesium or calcium. Hyperactive children become magnesium deficient for two reasons. First, like most American children, they consume less than the RDA of magnesium. Second, the high adrenaline levels associated with hyperactivity cause them to excrete excessive amounts of magnesium in the urine causing magnesium deficiency by depletion. Observational studies in Germany and in France reveal a high frequency of symptomatic magnesium deficiency in hyperactive children, especially those with headaches or abdominal pain. In my clinical practice I have found magnesium supplementation to be especially useful for sleep disturbances in children with ADHD, although the effects on hyperactive behavior are minimal. The dose needed is 100 milligrams per day for younger children and 200 milligrams for older children, taken at bedtime. If the child's diet is low in calcium, it may be necessary to add a calcium supplement, also taken at bedtime, 400 milligrams for younger children and 800 milligrams for older children. There is no evidence that calcium and magnesium interfere with each other's absorption or that a fixed ratio of calcium or magnesium must be administered to a child or on adult. A possible side effect of magnesium supplementation is diarrhea, whereas a possible side effect of calcium supplementation is constipation.
from http://www.mdheal.org/attention.htm

Magnesium and hearing:
Quote:
J Am Acad Audiol. 2003 May-Jun; 14(4): 202-12. Related Articles, Links
Magnesium and hearing.
Cevette MJ, Vormann J, Franz K.
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery/Audiology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ 85260, USA. mcevette@mayo.edu
The last several decades have revealed clinical and experimental data regarding the importance of magnesium (Mg) in hearing. Increased susceptibility to noise damage, ototoxicity, and auditory hyperexcitability are linked to states of Mg deficiency. Evidence for these processes has come slowly and direct effects have remained elusive because plasma Mg levels do not always correlate with its deficiency. Despite the major progress in the understanding of cochlear mechanical and auditory nerve function, the neurochemical and pharmacologic role of Mg is not clear. The putative mechanism suggests that Mg deficiency may contribute to a metabolic cellular cascade of events. Mg deficiency leads to an increased permeability of the calcium channel in the hair cells with a consequent over influx of calcium, an increased release of glutamate via exocytosis, and over stimulation of NMDA receptors on the auditory nerve. This paper provides a current overview of relevant Mg metabolism and deficiency and its influence on hearing.
Publication Types:
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PMID: 12940704 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Magnesium and Diabetes... this is a very important one...
Quote:
Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 1995 Sep;24(3):623-41. Related Articles, Links


Disorders of magnesium metabolism.

Nadler JL, Rude RK.

Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA.

Magnesium depletion is more common than previously thought. It seems to be especially prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus. It is usually caused by losses from the kidney or gastrointestinal tract. A patient with magnesium depletion may present with neuromuscular symptoms, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, or cardiovascular complication. Physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for magnesium depletion in patients at high risk and should implement therapy early.

Publication Types:
Review
Review, Tutorial

PMID: 8575413 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
and also:
Quote:
Magnesium and diabetes
Diabetes is a disease resulting in insufficient production and/or inefficient use of insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Insulin helps convert sugar and starches in food into energy to sustain life. There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is most often diagnosed in children and adolescents, and results from the body's inability to make insulin. Type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes referred to as adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. It is usually seen in adults and is most often associated with an inability to use the insulin made by the pancreas. Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. In recent years, rates of type 2 diabetes have increased along with the rising rates of obesity.

Magnesium plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism. It may influence the release and activity of insulin, the hormone that helps control blood glucose (sugar) levels [13]. Low blood levels of magnesium (hypomagnesemia) are frequently seen in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Hypomagnesemia may worsen insulin resistance, a condition that often precedes diabetes, or may be a consequence of insulin resistance. Individuals with insulin resistance do not use insulin efficiently and require greater amounts of insulin to maintain blood sugar within normal levels. The kidneys possibly lose their ability to retain magnesium during periods of severe hyperglycemia (significantly elevated blood glucose). The increased loss of magnesium in urine may then result in lower blood levels of magnesium [4]. In older adults, correcting magnesium depletion may improve insulin response and action [42].

The Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study (HFS) follow more than 170,000 health professionals through biennial questionnaires. Diet was first evaluated in 1980 in the NHS and in 1986 in the HFS, and dietary assessments have been completed every 2 to 4 years since. Information on the use of dietary supplements, including multivitamins, is also collected. As part of these studies, over 127,000 research subjects (85,060 women and 42,872 men) with no history of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer at baseline were followed to examine risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. Women were followed for 18 years; men were followed for 12 years. Over time, the risk for developing type 2 diabetes was greater in men and women with a lower magnesium intake. This study supports the dietary recommendation to increase consumption of major food sources of magnesium, such as whole grains, nuts, and green leafy vegetables [43].

The Iowa Women's Health Study has followed a group of older women since 1986. Researchers from this study examined the association between women's risk of developing type 2 diabetes and intake of carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and dietary magnesium. Dietary intake was estimated by a food frequency questionnaire, and incidence of diabetes throughout 6 years of follow-up was determined by asking participants if they had been diagnosed by a doctor as having diabetes. Based on baseline dietary intake assessment only, researchers' findings suggested that a greater intake of whole grains, dietary fiber, and magnesium decreased the risk of developing diabetes in older women [44].

The Women's Health Study was originally designed to evaluate the benefits versus risks of low-dose aspirin and vitamin E supplementation in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer in women 45 years of age and older. In an examination of almost 40,000 women participating in this study, researchers also examined the association between magnesium intake and incidence of type 2 diabetes over an average of 6 years. Among women who were overweight, the risk of developing type 2 diabetes was significantly greater among those with lower magnesium intake [45]. This study also supports the dietary recommendation to increase consumption of major food sources of magnesium, such as whole grains, nuts, and green leafy vegetables.

On the other hand, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study did not find any association between dietary magnesium intake and the risk for type 2 diabetes. During 6 years of follow-up, ARIC researchers examined the risk for type 2 diabetes in over 12,000 middle-aged adults without diabetes at baseline examination. In this study, there was no statistical association between dietary magnesium intake and incidence of type 2 diabetes in either black or white research subjects [46]. It can be confusing to read about studies that examine the same issue but have different results. Before reaching a conclusion on a health issue, scientists conduct and evaluate many studies. Over time, they determine when results are consistent enough to suggest a conclusion. They want to be sure they are providing correct recommendations to the public.

Several clinical studies have examined the potential benefit of supplemental magnesium on metabolic control of type 2 diabetes. In one such study, 63 subjects with below normal serum magnesium levels received either 2.5 grams of oral magnesium chloride daily "in liquid form" (providing 300 mg elemental magnesium per day) or a placebo. At the end of the 16-week study period, those who received the magnesium supplement had higher blood levels of magnesium and improved metabolic control of diabetes, as suggested by lower Hemoglobin A1C levels, than those who received a placebo [47]. Hemoglobin A1C is a test that measures overall control of blood glucose over the previous 2 to 3 months, and is considered by many doctors to be the single most important blood test for diabetics.

In another study, 128 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive a placebo or a supplement with either 500 mg or 1000 mg of magnesium oxide (MgO) for 30 days. All patients were also treated with diet or diet plus oral medication to control blood glucose levels. Magnesium levels increased in the group receiving 1000 mg magnesium oxide per day (equal to 600 mg elemental magnesium per day) but did not significantly change in the placebo group or the group receiving 500 mg of magnesium oxide per day (equal to 300 mg elemental magnesium per day). However, neither level of magnesium supplementation significantly improved blood glucose control [48].

These studies provide intriguing results but also suggest that additional research is needed to better explain the association between blood magnesium levels, dietary magnesium intake, and type 2 diabetes. In 1999, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) issued nutrition recommendations for diabetics stating that "…routine evaluation of blood magnesium level is recommended only in patients at high risk for magnesium deficiency. Levels of magnesium should be repleted (replaced) only if hypomagnesemia can be demonstrated" [21].
from: http://dietary-supplements.info.nih..../magnesium.asp
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Old 10-10-2006, 05:23 PM   #17
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Default continued....conditions...

Magnesium and exercise depletion:
Quote:
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2002;42(6):533-63. Related Articles, Links


Magnesium and exercise.

Bohl CH, Volpe SL.

University of Massachusetts, Department of Nutrition, Amherst 01003, USA.

Magnesium is an essential element that regulates membrane stability and neuromuscular, cardiovascular, immune, and hormonal functions and is a critical cofactor in many metabolic reactions. The Dietary Reference Intake for magnesium for adults is 310 to 420 mg/day. However, the intake of magnesium in humans is often suboptimal. Magnesium deficiency may lead to changes in gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and neuromuscular function. Physical exercise may deplete magnesium, which, together with a marginal dietary magnesium intake, may impair energy metabolism efficiency and the capacity for physical work. Magnesium assessment has been a challenge because of the absence of an accurate and convenient assessment method. Recently, magnesium has been touted as an agent for increasing athletic performance. This article reviews the various studies that have been conducted to investigate the relationship of magnesium and exercise.

Publication Types:
Review
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PMID: 12487419 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Magnesium and age:
Quote:
Magnes Res. 2001 Dec;14(4):283-90. Links
Prevalence of hypomagnesemia in an unselected German population of 16,000 individuals.

* Schimatschek HF,
* Rempis R.

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology of Nutrition, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany. schimats@uni-hohenheim.de

Based on a recently proposed reference range for plasma/serum Mg with its lower limit set at 0.76 mmol Mg/L the frequency of hypomagnesemia was evaluated in an unselected population group of about 16,000 individuals in total as well as in subgroups built according to sex, age and state of health. Hypomagnesemia was present in about 14.5 percent of all persons with generally higher frequencies in females and outpatients. In addition a slight but significant effect of age became overt. There was a continuous increase in the frequency of hypomagnesemia until the 29th year of life followed by a steady state. In elderlies, especially in old ladies, highest prevalence of up to one third of this subgroup occurred. Suboptimal levels were detected in 33.7 per cent of the population under study. These data clearly demonstrate that the Mg supply of the German population needs increased attention.

PMID: 11794636 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Magnesium and celiac disease:
Quote:
Wiad Lek. 2001;54(9-10):522-31. Links
[Reasons for magnesium deficiency in children with coeliac disease]
[Article in Polish]

* Rujner J,
* Wojtasik A,
* Syczewska M,
* Stolarczyk A,
* Kowalska M,
* Iwanow K,
* Kunachowicz H,
* Socha J.

Instytut Pomnik-Centrum Zdrowia Dziecka w Warszawie.

Magnesium (Mg) deficiency is often noted in patients with coeliac disease (CD). The aim of the study was the analysis of the reasons of this deficiency in children with CD, diagnosed according to ESPGAN criteria. MATERIAL: The study was performed on 41 patients aged 6-18 years adhering to strict gluten-free diet GFD(+) for mean 11 years, with normal small intestine mucosa, and IgAEmA(-), and on 32 patients aged 5-17 years on gluten containing diet, with classical CD, silent CD or after gluten challenge--GFD(-). In this group the villous atrophy of the small intestine and IgAEmA(+) were observed. In 18 of these patients Mg deficiency was found using Mg-loading test (30 mmol/1.73 m2). METHODS: The following parameters were analysed: type of the disease, observance of gluten-free diet, sex, and living place. Mg, Ca, Na, protein, fat, and dietary fiber intake was assessed using food frequency questionnaire method, and steatorrhea using faecal fat excretion (g/24 h). RESULTS: The frequency of Mg deficiency was similar in both sexes, occasionally in children from small towns (4.5%), and more often in children from big cities (31.5%), and village (34.4%). Dietary Mg intake below RDA was observed in 23% of children from GFD(+) group, in 19% from GFD(-) one, and in 17.6% in children with Mg deficiency. Insufficient Mg intake was found in 18.2% of children from small towns, in 17.6% from big cities, and in 12.5% from villages; Ca in 36.6%, 58.8%, and 59.3%, and protein in 18.2%, 35.3%, and in 34.4% respectively. In all groups of children high intake of fat and Na was observed. Dietary fiber intake was within the recommended values. All children with classical CD had increased fat excretion (mean 25.9 g/24 h), in other patients it was within normal values [GFD(+) mean 1.95 g/24 h, in GFD(-) without diarrhoea 1.7 g/24 h. CONCLUSIONS: Magnesium deficiency in children with CD depends on the form of the disease, adhering to GFD, diarrhoea with steatorrhea, and/or low Mg intake with the diet.

PMID: 11816296 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Poor food choices in USA:
Quote:
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2003 Aug;157(8):789-96. Related Articles, Links


Reported consumption of low-nutrient-density foods by American children and adolescents: nutritional and health correlates, NHANES III, 1988 to 1994.

Kant AK.

Department of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences, Queens College of the City University of New York, Flushing 11367, USA. ashima_kant@qc.edu

OBJECTIVE: To examine the contribution of foods of modest nutritional value to the diets of American children and adolescents. METHODS: The data were from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988 to 1994, and included 4852 children and adolescents, aged 8 to 18 years. Foods reported in the 24-hour dietary recall were grouped into the following low-nutrient-density (LND) food categories: visible fat; table sweeteners, candy, and sweetened beverages; baked and dairy desserts; salty snacks; and miscellaneous. The independent association of the number of LND foods mentioned in the recall with intake of food groups, macronutrients, micronutrients, and body mass index was examined by means of regression procedures to adjust for multiple covariates. RESULTS: The LND foods contributed more than 30% of daily energy, with sweeteners and desserts jointly accounting for nearly 25%. Intakes of total energy and percentage of energy from carbohydrate and fat related positively, but percentage of energy from protein and dietary fiber (in grams) related inversely to the reported number of LND foods (P<.05). The reported number of LND foods was a negative predictor (P<.001) of the amount of nutrient-dense foods reported. The mean amount of reported intake of several micronutrients-vitamins A, B6, and folate, and the minerals calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc-declined (P<.05) with increasing tertiles of reported number of LND foods. The LND food reporting was not a significant predictor of body mass index. CONCLUSION: High LND food reporting was related to higher energy intake but lower amounts of the 5 major food groups and most micronutrients.
PMID: 12912785 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
and also:
Quote:
J Am Diet Assoc. 2002 Apr;102(4):530-6. Related Articles, Links


Using Dietary Reference Intake-based methods to estimate the prevalence of inadequate nutrient intake among school-aged children.

Suitor CW, Gleason PM.

Mathematica Policy Research, Princeton, NJ, USA.

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of inadequate usual intakes of nutrients by school-aged children. DESIGN: A descriptive study using data from the US Department of Agriculture 1994 to 1996 Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals. Each subject provided two 24-hour recalls. We adjusted for day-to-day variation in nutrient intake and estimated the percentage of children with intakes below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) using the Software for Intake Distribution Estimation Program. SUBJECTS: A national sample of noninstitutionalized children aged 6 to 18 years (N=2,692). STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Chi2 tests showed that background characteristics or percentages with intakes below the EAR were the same across the 6 gender-age and racial/ethnic groups. The SUDAAN statistical package was used to account for the complex sample design. RESULTS: Usual intakes were more favorable for 5 B vitamins and iron than for the other nutrients examined. High percentages of children had intakes below the EAR for vitamin E. Many children aged 9 years and older had intakes below the EAR for folate and magnesium. Females aged 9 years and older had low calcium intakes relative to the Adequate Intake value. Females aged 14 to 18 years were at highest risk of usual intakes that did not meet the EARs. Few males in this age group met the EAR for vitamin E or magnesium. APPLICATIONS: Females aged 14 to 18, in particular, should be targeted for efforts to improve nutrient intakes. Studies should monitor children's usual nutrient intakes after adjusting for day-to-day variation.

PMID: 11985410 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Wearing contacts? Have corneal issues?
Quote:
Cornea. 2003 Jul;22(5):448-56.Click here to read Links
Corneal changes in magnesium-deficient rats.

* Gong H,
* Takami Y,
* Kitaoka T,
* Amemiya T.

Department of Ophlamology and Visual Sciences, Nagasaki Univerity School of Medicine, Japan. hgong@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp

PURPOSE: The purpose of the current study is to investigate the cornea in magnesium (Mg) deficiency and elucidate the local function of trace elements. METHODS: After delivery, mother Wistar Kyoto rats were fed a low Mg diet containing 0.1 mg Mg/100 g diet with all other nutrients and distilled and deionized water. Infant rats were suckled by their mothers for 21 days and then fed the same Mg-deficient diet. Control mother rats were fed commercial rat pellets containing 24 mg Mg/100 g diet and all other nutrients. The corneas were examined by electron microscopy at 6 weeks of age. RESULTS: In the Mg-deficient rats, serum Mg levels were significantly lower and calcium (Ca) levels higher than in the control rats. The corneas of Mg-deficient rats showed decreased microvilli and microplicae in the epithelial cells of the most superficial layer, increased mitochondria with abnormal shapes in the basal cells in the epithelium, condensed chromatin in the nuclei of the basal cells, and high density deposits and macrophage-like cells in the subepithelium of the stroma. Mg-deficient rats had pentagonal and square endothelial cells. CONCLUSION: Since Mg2+ has biologic functions including structural stabilization of protein, nucleic acids, and cell membranes, Mg deficiency may induce changes in the corneal surface and nuclei of corneal epithelial and endothelial cells. These disturbances may interfere with protection from infections, foreign bodies, dryness, and direct exposure to air. Thus, Mg is essential for the cornea to maintain normal structure and function.

PMID: 12827051 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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b onna (02-28-2010)
Old 10-10-2006, 05:26 PM   #18
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Lightbulb Tourette's...

This is the only paper on PubMed so far about Mag/Tourettes...
some will recognize an old friend..the author of this paper:
Quote:
Med Hypotheses. 2002 Jan;58(1):47-60.Click here to read Links
The central role of magnesium deficiency in Tourette's syndrome: causal relationships between magnesium deficiency, altered biochemical pathways and symptoms relating to Tourette's syndrome and several reported comorbid conditions.

* Grimaldi BL.

BonnieGr@aol.com

Prior studies have suggested a common etiology involved in Tourette's syndrome and several comorbid conditions and symptomatology. Reportedly, current medications used in Tourette's syndrome have intolerable side-effects or are ineffective for many patients. After thoroughly researching the literature, I hypothesize that magnesium deficiency may be the central precipitating event and common pathway for the subsequent biochemical effects on substance P, kynurenine, NMDA receptors, and vitamin B6 that may result in the symptomatology of Tourette's syndrome and several reported comorbid conditions. These comorbid conditions and symptomatology include allergy, asthma, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, coprolalia, copropraxia, anxiety, depression, restless leg syndrome, migraine, self-injurious behavior, autoimmunity, rage, bruxism, seizure, heart arrhythmia, heightened sensitivity to sensory stimuli, and an exaggerated startle response. Common possible environmental and genetic factors are discussed, as well as biochemical mechanisms. Clinical studies to determine the medical efficacy for a comprehensive magnesium treatment option for Tourette's syndrome need to be conducted to make this relatively safe, low side-effect treatment option available to doctors and their patients. Copyright 2002 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

PMID: 11863398 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Old 10-10-2006, 07:26 PM   #19
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Lightbulb Magnesium and bruxism...

Bruxism= grinding of the teeth, esp at night while sleeping.

http://www.is.wayne.edu/mnissani/bruxnet/ploctran.htm
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Old 10-28-2006, 06:37 PM   #20
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Post more magnesium information..

Magnesium and the heart:
Quote:
1: Heart Fail Rev. 2006 Mar;11(1):35-44.Click here to read Links
The nerve-heart connection in the pro-oxidant response to Mg-deficiency.

* Tejero-Taldo MI,
* Kramer JH,
* Mak IuT,
* Komarov AM,
* Weglicki WB.

Dept. of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Div. of Experimental Medicine, The George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20037, USA. phymit@gwumc.edu

Magnesium is a micronutrient essential for the normal functioning of the cardiovascular system, and Mg deficiency (MgD) is frequently associated in the clinical setting with chronic pathologies such as CHF, diabetes, hypertension, and other pathologies. Animal models of MgD have demonstrated a systemic pro-inflammatory/pro-oxidant state, involving multiple tissues/organs including neuronal, hematopoietic, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal systems; during later stages of MgD, a cardiomyopathy develops which may result from a cascade of inflammatory events. In rodent models of dietary MgD, a significant rise in circulating levels of proinflammatory neuropeptides such as substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide among others, was observed within days (1-7) of initiating the Mg-restricted diet, and implicated a neurogenic trigger for the subsequent inflammatory events; this early "neurogenic inflammation" phase may be mediated in part, by the Mg-gated N: -methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor/channel complex. Deregulation of the NMDA receptor may trigger the abrupt release of neuronal SP from the sensory-motor C-fibers to promote the subsequent pro-inflammatory changes: elevations in circulating inflammatory cells, inflammatory cytokines, histamine, and PGE(2) levels, as well as formation of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation products, and depletion of key endogenous antioxidants. Concurrent elevations of tissue CD14, a high affinity receptor for lipopolyssacharide, suggest that intestinal permeability may be compromised leading to endotoxemia. If exposure to these early (1-3 weeks MgD) inflammatory/pro-oxidant events becomes prolonged, this might lead to impaired cardiac function, and when co-existing with other pathologies, may enhance the risk of developing chronic heart failure.

PMID: 16819576 [PubMed - in process]
Magnesium and seizures... including other variables:
http://www.epilepsy.com/epilepsy/provoke_nutrition.html

Magnesium and osteoporosis:
http://www.mdschoice.com/text/abstra...m/magosteo.htm

and while this is relatively new in the lay media...it is not new in the research fields...
Quote:
Magnes Res. 1988 Jul;1(1-2):85-7. Related Articles, Links

Recent data on magnesium and osteoporosis.

Cohen L.

Department of Medicine B, Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Lady Davis Carmel Hospital, Haifa, Israel.

Larger and more perfect bone mineral crystals and decreased bone magnesium concentration were found in postmenopausal osteoporosis, senile osteoporosis, alcoholic osteoporosis and osteoporosis associated with thalassaemia. The decreased bone magnesium concentration and the increased retention of magnesium in the magnesium load test suggest magnesium deficiency in post-menoposal osteoporosis, probably caused by magnesium malabsorption.

Publication Types:

* Review


PMID: 3079205 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
There have been suggestions that chronic low magnesium levels contribute to the formation of bone spurs (the bane of arthritis patients, and spinal patients). I could not at this time find good papers to support this theory, but it remains active on the net.
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