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Old 04-06-2007, 04:05 PM #1
wasabi wasabi is offline
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Default Vit. D Deficiency Not the Cause, Vit. D Supplementation Not the Cure for Rickets

In the presence of sufficient calcium, the cause of rickets is hypophosphatemia:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_DocSum

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_docsum

"Dr. Marshall wrote the author, asking what evidence there is to back the statements in that paper that Vitamin D helps the gut absorb calcium. The reply he received said:
'We have no data that 1,25 has any effect on the prevention of rickets ..
Absence of ligand or receptor in the presence of normal mineral ions leads to a normal growth..'"

"Dr. Marshall did note that 'the VDR does transcribe CASR and PTH and TRPV5 and TRPV6, all of which are active in calcium homeostasis.'"

http://www.marshallprotocol.com/forum39/8687.html

Last edited by wasabi; 04-06-2007 at 04:35 PM.
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Old 04-07-2007, 06:39 AM #2
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Lightbulb low phosphate or deficiency is not common.

In fact I have met people who regularly test high for this mineral.
(stumping doctors)

Quote:
Severe hypophosphatemia may result in death. Because phosphorus is so widespread in food, dietary phosphorus deficiency is usually seen only in cases of near total starvation. Other individuals at risk of hypophosphatemia include alcoholics, diabetics recovering from an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis, and starving or anorexic patients on refeeding regimens that are high in calories but too low in phosphorus (1,2).
Here is a good monograph on phosphorus:
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocente...ls/phosphorus/

fructose trapping: a serious dietary concern today:
Quote:
A recent study of 11 adult men found that a diet high in fructose (20% of total calories) resulted in increased urinary loss of phosphorus and a negative phosphorus balance (i.e., daily loss of phosphorus was higher than daily intake). This effect was more pronounced if the diet was also low in magnesium (3). A potential mechanism for this effect is the lack of feedback inhibition of the conversion of fructose to fructose-1-phosphate in the liver. In other words, increased accumulation of fructose-1-phosphate in the cell does not inhibit the enzyme that phosphorylates fructose, using up large amounts of phosphate. This phenomenon is known as phosphate trapping (1). This finding is relevant because fructose consumption in the U.S. has been increasing rapidly since the introduction of high fructose corn syrup in 1970, while magnesium intake has decreased over the past century (3).
and causes of low phosphate:
Quote:
Inadequate phosphorus intake results in abnormally low serum phosphate levels (hypophosphatemia). The effects of hypophosphatemia may include loss of appetite, anemia, muscle weakness, bone pain, rickets (in children), osteomalacia (in adults), increased susceptibility to infection, numbness and tingling of the extremities, and difficulty walking. Severe hypophosphatemia may result in death. Because phosphorus is so widespread in food, dietary phosphorus deficiency is usually seen only in cases of near total starvation. Other individuals at risk of hypophosphatemia include alcoholics, diabetics recovering from an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis, and starving or anorexic patients on refeeding regimens that are high in calories but too low in phosphorus (1,2).
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Old 04-07-2007, 01:11 PM #3
wasabi wasabi is offline
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mrsd,

Thank you for your post. Very interesting information.

I didn't know about the effects of fructose on trapping phosphate. Here's an interesting study on soft drink consumption:

http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20050618/food.asp

You quoted a study: "A recent study of 11 adult men found that a diet high in fructose (20% of total calories) resulted in increased urinary loss of phosphorus and a negative phosphorus balance (i.e., daily loss of phosphorus was higher than daily intake). This effect was more pronounced if the diet was also low in magnesium (3)." According to the science news article there are teenagers who may be getting 1/3 or more of their calories from soft drinks and fruit juices. I would be will to bet that their diets are low in magnesium as well.

If people consume fruit, soft drinks, fruit juice and energy bars (high fructose corn syrup is the first ingredient listed in one Power Bar I looked at), they are getting an awful lot of fructose.

I understand that hypophosphatemia is unlikely to occur in the US these days, although I am sure that it still happens. It is just very interesting to find that only now are we discovering that lack of vitamin D does not cause rickets - something that virtually no medical doctor these days knows yet, I would guess.
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Old 04-20-2021, 08:52 PM #4
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Lightbulb Hypophosphatemia and cancer treatments.

Bear with me please...

Interesting old thread I found it in my search for "Hypophosphatemia" here this morning.

Actually, hypophosphatemia is not uncommon in the treatment of certain cancers.

DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2019.37.15_suppl.3002 Journal of Clinical Oncology 37, no. 15_suppl (May 20, 2019) 3002-3002.
Dabrafenib and trametinib in patients with tumors with BRAF V600E/K mutations: Journal of Clinical Oncology
Quote:
The most frequent grade 3 AEs were fatigue, neutropenia, hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, and urinary tract infection;
In my never ending quest for answers to my sudden onset peripheral neuropathy, I came across information that I was not aware of a year ago, basically because I was never informed. Such is life in the public health system.

Yesterday in the back of a cupboard I came across an old tube of effervescent phosphate tabs that I'd forgotten all about and I started thinking... why I was prescribed this at the time and then I also recalled being given a phosphate drip in the hospital when I suffered side effects from my cancer treatment. Why did that happen and why was none of this explained to me at the time. I got on PubMed and started researching low phosphate and Targeted Therapy for met melanoma. Apparently it's actually quite common and very, very dangerous.

So, the rapid PN onset coincided with my being treated for just over a week with Dabrafenib and Trametinib for Metastatic Melanoma and ending up in hospital on a phosphate drip amongst other things.

Dabrafenib and Trametinib are medications described as "Targeted Therapy".
Half (approx.) of melanomas are BRAF positive so Targeted Therapy is often used as first line treatment in a BRAF positive patient. A BRAF mutation is a change in a BRAF gene. The mutation alters protein and that in turn affects the rate of cell growth.

I now wonder if it was actually hypophosphatemia that caused my neuropathy or if that's even possible. I had been led to believe it was the Dabrafenib and Trametinib that caused it.

Next step is to get Freedom Of Information access to my old file (I changed Doctors after all this happened to me) and find out exactly what was going on and being put into me in that week of my life that nearly ended me.
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